Synopsis of the Stories from French Versions A and L

Too literally translated by

Hans R. Runte

 

                                                              Sources:

Version A:

Runte, Hans R., trans. ”The Seven Sages of Rome (French Version A) from MS. Paris, BN f.fr. 2137 at Link 1 or

Link 2 [search for (French Version A)]

For the edition of French Version A see Link 1 or Link 2 [in the left margin scroll to and click on:

Les sept sages de Rome: an on-line edition]

Version L:

Le Roux de Lincy, Antoine-Jean-Victor. Roman des sept sages de Rome […]. Paris: Techener, 1838 [AB 499].

Edited from MS. Paris, B.N. f.fr. 19166.

 

Passages where A deviates more or less from L are marked in yellow

Rare out-of-sequence displacements of similar passages are marked in green

 

Arbor

The empress’s first story

 

A  [fol. 6b] “In this city there once was a burgher who had a very beautiful garden which was big and planted

L  [p. 13] “In this city there was a burgher who had a garden. This garden was big and beautiful and planted

 

A  with all [kinds of] good trees. In the centre of this garden there was a pine which was more beautiful and taller and

L  with good trees. In the centre of this garden there was a pine which was so tall and so beautiful and so

 

A  straighter than any other. The nobleman made [his gardener] look for the best soils [fol. 6c] one could find and

L  straight and so aligned like no other. The nobleman made [his gardener] bring in the best soils that he could find and

 

A  had it put at the foot of the pine. The pine sprouted forth and grew as one could wish, and

L  put [them] at the foot of the pine. After a little bit of time [had] passed, the pine flourished and came [along] as desired,

 

A  out of the growth arose a little pine from one of the main roots and came along as one could wish.

L  so that all marvelled [at it]. Out of the flourishing of the pine arose a little pine from one of the major roots. And the

     little pine came [along] very vigorously as desired. Among these things the burgher entered his garden and

 

A  Whenever the burgher saw it, he derived great joy from it and made [his gardener] look for the best soil one could find

L  and saw the little pine [that had] arisen from the big one and had great joy from it; so he made [his gardener] bring in

     the best soil that one could find

 

A  and had it put at the foot of the pine. [So it went] until the nobleman had gone on his business trip and stayed [away] a

L  and had it put at the foot of the little pine; and the little pine came [along] as desired, and so [it went] until the

     nobleman had gone on his business and stayed [away] a

 

A  long time. And when he had come back, the first thing he did was to go in his garden and found his little pine short.

L  long time. And when he had come back, the first thing that he did [was that] he went into his garden to see his little pine

    and saw it twisted by a branch of the big pine.

 

A  So he called his gardener and said to him: ‘What’s this? Why is my little pine [so] short?’ ’Sir, goes the gardener,

L  So he called his gardener: ‘What is this? How does this go? Why is my little pine twisted?’

     ‘Sire,’ goes the gardener,

 

A  don’t you see why?’ ’Not at all,’ he ges. ’I will tell you why. Look up [and see] how the branch of the [fol. 6d] holds it

L  ‘do you net see why?’ “Nothing to see,’ said the nobleman. ‘Sire, I will tell you it. Look up and you will see that the

     branch of this [p. 14] big pine is holding it

 

A  [back] so  that it cannot go forward. ’Cut it off,’ goes the nobleman. ’Sire, willingly.’ He took the axe and took a

L  and that it cannot go ahead.’ ‘Cut it down,’ said the burgher.’ ‘Sire,’ he goes, ‘willingly.’ He takes the axe and puts the

 

A  ladder and put it against the branch and struck until the branch was cut off. When it was cut off, the nobleman

L  ladder up high and strikes and strikes again until he has cut down the branch. And when he has cut it down, the nobleman

 

A  said to him: ’Cut [on] and make a path for it.’ ’Sire, willingly.’” ”Now, Sire, goes
L  exclaimed: ‘Cut again, make a way for it.’ And he responds: ‘Willingly, sire, at your command.’” “Now, sire,” goes

 

A  the empress, “thus is the big pine cut [back] and made ugly in favour of the little pine. And there is  still more,
L  the empress, “is the big pine for [the benefit] of its little pine clipped and clipped crookedly and made ugly even more,

 

A  for the little pine came from the front stump and cut, and [because] of the force [involved] one of the main roots

L  for the little pine came forth and flourished much, and from its flourishing and from its force it lifted up one of the

     major roots

 

A  rose [through the soil] and dried out at that point.

L  of the big pine, and when the big pine had lost one of its major roots, it dried up in this part and was without leaves

    and without greenness in this part,

 

A  When the nobleman came back into his garden one day and saw the little pine which came along

L  and the nobleman came into his garden and saw the little pine which was tall and beautiful and was coming [along]

 

A  as one could wish and which had already outgrown the other one, and when he saw the big one [fol. 7a] dried out

L  as [one could] wish. And he saw that it surmounted in beauty the big pine and saw that the big one was dried up

 

A  in one section, he said to his gardener: ’What does,’ he goes, ‘this big pine have which is dried out?’ ’Sir,’

L  in one part, so he said to his gardener: ‘What is this?’ he goes, ‘tell me why this big pine is dried up.’ ‘Why, sire?’

 

A  he goes, ‘the shade of your little pine does that.

L  said the gardener, ‘the shade of your little pine does this, which has thus surmounted it in all things.’

 

A  ‘So cut [the big one] down altogether,’ says the gentleman. ’Willingly, sire’, he goes.”

L  ‘So cut it down altogether,’ said the burgher, and right away, me seeing [it].’ ‘Sire, willingly,’ said the gardener.

      He takes the axe and cuts and splits it to the core.”

 

 

Canis

The first sage’s, Bancillas’s/Baucillas’s story

 

A  [fol. 8a] “In this city it happened [fol. 8b] on a day which is called the King of Sundays (that’s the day of the Trinity)

L  p. 17] “It happened once in this city on a day which is called the King of Sundays, that is the day of the Trinity,

 

A  that the knights must go to amuse themselves in the meadows.

L  that all knights have to amuse themselves on their horses and hang the[ir] shields around the[ir] neck. And so it

    happened that the knights of this city went to amuse themselves on the meadows,

 

A  The knight’s meadow was down from his house and the house was enclosed by an old and ancient and cracked wall.

L  and the meadows were next to the house of a nobleman. The house was enclosed by old, ancient and cracked walls.

 

A  He was rich and had from his wife a small child in the cradle. The child had three nurses: the first served 

L  And he was rich and powerful and had a little child in the cradle by his wife. The child had three nurses. The first one served

 

A  to breast-feed him, the second to bathe him, the third to shake out the sheets and to put him to bed. The knight had

L  to breast-feed it and the second to bathe [it] and the third to change the sheets and to put [it] to bed. The nobleman had

 

A  a strong and fast greyhound which reached all the things after which he ran, and whatever he reached he took.

L  a beautiful and big and fast greyhound, so that it reached anything it ran after and as soon as it reached [it] it took [it].

 

A  The greyhound was better than any other, and the gentleman loved him more than anything.

L  The greyhound was so good that no other was better, and the knight loved it so much that he did not love anything else

      as much.

 

A  The knight had gone out [fol. 8c] on his horse into the meadows with the others, [his] sword girthed, the shield at his

L  The nobleman issued forth on his horse, [his] sword girthed, shield at [his]

 

A  neck, the lance in his fist. And his wife had gone out beyond the door onto the drawbridge, and the nurses

L  neck, lance in [his] fist, with the others. And the lady had issued forth from the door, onto the drawbridge. And among

     these things the nurses

 

A  had brought the child to the foot of the wall and were climbing up the stairs to the crenels of the wall. The knights

L  the child in the cradle to the foot of the wall and had mounted on top of the stairs,[way] up, to the crenels. The knights

 

A  began to tourney against one another. A serpent was living in the wall [and] it heard the noise of the shields and of

L  began to tourney against one another. A serpent had nourished itself in the wall. The serpent heard the noise and the tumult

     of the shields and of

 

A  the lances, so it wondered much about it [because] it had not at all learned such a custom.

L  the lances, [p. 18] and of the horses; so it marvelled at that, for it had not at all learned this nor been accustomed [to it].

 

A  So it raised its head and issued forth out of the wall through one of the crevices.

L  So it raised its head and moved out very quickly and came out through one of the crevices of the wall into the nobleman’s

     courtyard and into the enclosure which was very beautiful.

 

A  The serpent came toward the cradle, and on the threshold of the hall was the greyhound

L  And it came now toward the cradle where the child had been left by its nurses. The greyhound was on the threshold

     of the hall

 

A  which heard the noise of the tourney and saw the big [fol. 8d] and hideous and poisonous serpent.

L  and had heard the noise of the tourney fighters. And the big and fat serpent came, and it was hideous and enveloped

    in red colour. It was poisonous in all its limbs. The greyhound, when it saw it coming toward the cradle, strikes the

    earth with its feet and scratches very hard;

 

A  Then it went up to the serpent and took it in the middle of the fat [part] of the stomach. The serpent raised [its] head

L  and it comes toward the serpent and takes it by the fat middle of the stomach. The serpent raises its head

 

A  and bit it in the neck. From the anguish and from the pain it felt

L  and takes it by the middle of the neck, at the tooth, so that the blood issued forth. [Because] of the pain and of the

     anguish that the greyhound felt and [because] of the serpent’s bite and of the pain of the poison which aggrieves it still more,

 

A  [the greyhound] cried out, and then it returns to the serpent and leaps over the cradle and then over the serpent.

L  [the greyhound] flings the serpent behind itself, over the cradle and [goes] after it, [also] over the cradle.

 

A  The cradle was turned upside down, but there was such good luck that the

L  And the cradle turns over right away, upside down. But there was much of an advantage in that the

 

A  two headboards of the cradle were high so that the child’s face did not touch the ground.

L  two [head- and foot] boards of the cradle were so high that the child’s face reached not at all the ground.

 

A  The battle between the serpent and the greyhound began. The serpent wanted to flee,

L  And the battle of the serpent and the greyhound recommences, and soon [enough] the serpent wanted to go away

     and depart from the greyhound.

 

A  but the greyhound took it in the middle of the fat [part] of the stomach, and the serpent bit it in

L  But the greyhound takes it by the middle of the fat [part] of the neck, by that part where it had taken it before

    very hurtfully. And the serpent raises its head and takes it very bitterly in that part of

 

A  the side. The greyhound cried out from the pain he felt, so it leaped once again over the cradle,

L  its side where it had bitten it before. And the greyhound cries out [because] of the pain that it felt, and so it flings

     it again up [p. 19] over the cradle, and the serpent thinks of going away, and the greyhound leaps forward.

     Then the struggle and the battle of the two recommences

 

A  so that the cradle was all bloody from it [fol. 9a] and the whole place as well, until at the end the greyhound took it

L  so that the whole cradle is bloody, all over the place, and the grass [is] bloodied.

 

A  by the head and strangled it with all its might in such a manner that it killed the serpent and it was dead.

L  And at the end of the struggle the greyhound takes it by the head and strangles it with its power and kills it.

 

A  [By] then the greyhound had so much rage in itself that it did not

L  And the greyhound had such great anger in itself, because it had injured it so badly, that it did not

 

A  want at all to leave it as such, but it sliced it into three sections, then left it thus.

L  want at all to leave it at that, but truncates it into three sections and leaves it. During the struggle which

     had been there

 

A  The cradle and the place around [it] were all bloody, and the greyhound was all swollen and bloodied.

L  the cradle was bloodied and [so was] the entire place, and the greyhound, be it [because] of the blood,

     be it [because] of the poison, was [now] ugly and hideous and swollen and bloodied.

 

A  It entered the hall and began to shout and to scream and to writhe among the layers [of its blankets]

L  It entered now the hall and lay down and began to cry and to shriek and to writhe among benches and

     among beds and in [his] blanket and on the ground

 

A  and was shouting like someone who was totally destroyed and anguished.

L  and cried and shouted very forcefully like someone who was destroyed very bitterly by evil.

 

A  It was late afternoon and the knights’ tourney ends and everyone left for his home.

L  It was late afternoon and the knights’ tourney ended and everyone left for his house and for his lodging,

     as they must do.

 

A  The nurses went down the [fol. 9b] stairs of the wall and came into the hall and saw the cradle

L  The nurses came down the steps of the wall and saw [that] the cradle

 

A  upside down and the place around all bloody. They looked towards

L  [was] overturned and all bloody and the [whole] place bloody [as well], and came toward

 

A  the greyhound which was wailing, so they thought that it was rabid and that it

L  the greyhound which was crying and shouting and shrieking. So they believed that it was rabid and out of [its]

     sense[s] and that it

 

A  had strangled and eaten the child, for the reason that they saw him bloody.

L  had strangled and eaten the child because they saw [that the greyhound was] bloody and ugly and hideous.

 

A  So they began to shout and to scream and to tear at their hair and to say: ‘Ha, poor us,

L  So they began to cry and to hit [p. 20] their palms and to pull out their hair and said: ‘Ha, poor us,

 

A  what shall we do? What will we be able to become? Let’s flee from here!’ That piece of advice was

L  poor us, miserable us, what are we going to do? Let’s flee from here!’ This advice was

 

A  soon taken: they hit the road and flee. As they were passing the

L  soon taken and they hit the ground with their feet and go away. As they were passing [through] the

 

A  door they met their lady on the drawbridge. She saw [how] ugly and frightened they were,

L  door they found the lady on the bridge. When the lady saw them so frightened, so ugly and so hideous,

 

A  so she asked them what was the matter with them, and they replied that the greyhound was rabid

L  she asks them what [ problem] they had. And they responded to her together that the greyhound was rabid

 

A  and had [fol. 9c] strangled and killed her child. [When she heard] this reply, the lady let out a shout

L  and had strangled and killed her child. At this word the lady let out a cry

 

A  and fainted. And when she had returned [to her senses], her lord had come, with the shield at his neck,

L  and fainted. She was a while in [a state of] fainting, and when she had come back, her lord came

     on his horse, shield at his neck,

 

A  who had tourneyed with the others. He saw his wife who told him that his greyhound was rabid

L  and had amused himself and tourneyed with the others. He saw his wife who said to him that his greyhound

    that he loved so much, was rabid

 

A  and that it had strangled his child. ‘For sure,’ goes the knight, ‘this weighs on me.’ He came into the

L  and had eaten and devoured his child in a bad manner. ‘Certainly,’ goes the sire, ‘this weighs on me.’ He

    passes  over the drawbridge and comes up to the

 

A  court[yard] and dismounted. There were enough [men] who held his horse for him and took his shield and

L  court[yard] and dismounts. There were enough [men] who held his horse and his shield and

 

A  his lance. The greyhound recognized his master’s horse. and thought that he had come. When it heard him

L  his lance. The greyhound recognized his master’s horse and thought that his sire had come. It heard him

 

A  speak, it sprang up on its feet, sick as it was, and went up to his master and put its two forefeet in the

L  speak and springs to [his] feet, as sick and as bloody as it was. It saw its master and comes toward him,

     the fastest it ever could and jumps up to the

 

A  middle of his chest. The knight had heard [the] news of his [fol. 9d] greyhound which had killed his child.

L  middle before [all]. The sire was very deeply angered and enraged by the news about his child that the

     greyhound had killed,

 

A  He was so anguished that he now draws [his] sword and cut its head off, then handed it to one of

L  and so he draws [his] sword and cuts its head off. The sire brings the sword to

 

A  his squires. Afterwards he went up into the hall and looked in the direction of the cradle and saw

L  a servant to be wiped and goes right away toward the hall and looks toward the cradle and [p. 21] saw

 

A  [that] it was all blood[-stained] and [that] the place [around it was] all blood[-stained, too]. He came over

L  [that it was] all bloody and [that] the place [was] all bloody [too]. So he comes back

 

A  there and found the three sections of the serpent and then wondered much how this could have happened.

L  that way and finds the three sections of the serpent. So he marvels very strongly and crosses himself. And

     he lowered himself and puts [his] hand on the cradle and turns it right side up.

 

A  He came over to the cradle and saw [how it was] upside down and found the child alive. So he called

L  And he found the child alive. So he calls

 

A  the lady and the people who had come with him, for them to see this marvel. They looked at

L  the lady in very great anger and [calls] many people who had come to see this marvel. He showed them

 

A  the serpent

L  the marvel of the serpent which was truncated into three. And he looks toward the greyhound and

 

A  and knew with certainty that the greyhound had fought with the serpent for the child, to protect the child.

L  knew in truth that the greyhound had battled with serpent in order to protect the child.

 

A  [fol. 10a] So the knight  said to the lady: ‘Madam, you made me kill my greyhound over our child

L  So he turns toward the lady and said: ‘Ha, [my] lady, you have made me kill my greyhound for the fact

 

A  that he had protected against death. I believed you, which [means that] I did not act wisely. But know

L  that it had protected your child from death. And I believed you and I have not acted wisely, but now know

 

A  this much: for what I did upon your advice,

L  that that, for what I have believed you and what I have done for you and with your advice,

 

A  nobody will give me penance, rather I will give it to me myself.’ He sat down and had his shoes removed

L  nobody will give me penance [but] I myself will take it.’ He sat down and has himself unbooted by one of

     his servants

 

A  and then cut off the front part of his shoes and left without looking at [any] wife or child he may have had,

L  and cuts off the front end of his boots without regard of wife, nor son, nor heritage, nor gold, nor silver,

     nor the riches that he may have had,

 

A  and fled into exile because of the anger his greyhound [had caused him].”

L  and goes away into exile because of the anger about his greyhound, so that nobody could know where

     he had gone.”

 

 

Aper

The empress’s second story

 

A  [fol. 10c] “In this country was once a big and marvelous forest, abundant with fruits and shrubs.

L  [p. 22] “There was in this country a big and marvelous forest and [was] plentiful in fruit and in shrubs.

 

A  In it lived peacefully a big, fully grown and proud boar, so that nobody

L  A boar had nourished itself in this forest, it was big and fully grown and fierce and proud, so that nobody

 

A  dared enter the forest in these parts. In the middle of this forest in a [certain] place

L  dare enter to go to that part in the forest where the boar might have been. In the middle of the forest

     there was a meadow; and in the middle of this meadow there

 

A  was a service-tree which was well loaded with ripe sorb-apples. The boar got drunk with them

L  was a service-tree which was big and marvelous and well loaded with ripe sorb-apples. The boar came there

 

A  once every day. One day a shepherd had lost one of his animals [which] had fled into

L  every day to get drunk. One time a shepherd had lost one of his animals [which] had beaten [its path] into

  

A  the forest. The shepherd came there and saw the service-tree and coveted much some of the sorb-apples

L  the forest. The shepherd came that way, under that service-tree, and coveted the sorb-apples

 

A  [fol. 10d] which lay on the ground. He lowered himself and began to gather them up until he had

L  that he saw on the ground, so ripe; so he lowers himself and [p. 23] begins to pick them until he had

 

A  his apron full of them. While he was filling his other apron, there came the boar.

L  filled one of his aprons with them. And in the meantime, while he was filling the other one, at that moment see

     here the boar coming!

 

A  When the shepherd saw it coming, he was afraid and right he was, and wanted to flee. But he saw the boar

L  The shepherd was frightened when he saw the boar and wanted to go away. But he saw the boar

 

A  coming so close to him that he did not dare, so he was so perplexed that he did not know what to do.

L  approach him so that he knew well that fleeing was worth nothing.

 

A  Then he looked up the service-tree and climbed up. The boar came underneath the service-tree.

L  So he looked  up at the service-tree and climbs up it as well as he could. The boar came toward the service-tree

 

A  It wondered much why it had not found as many sorb-apples as it

L  and began to eat. It marvels very strongly at [the fact] that it could not otherwise find sorb-apples as it

    

A  usually did, then looked up the service-tree and saw the shepherd. Then it got angry and began to chew

L  used to do before. It looks up and sees the shepherd on the service-tree. So it was furious and began to chew

 

A  and to gnash its teeth and to sharpen its two [front] feet against the ground and struck with its teeth

L  and to foam and began to sharpen its two feet against the ground and strikes into [and]

 

A  against the service-tree so that everything shook. [fol. 11a] It seemed to him who was up in [the tree]

L  against the service-tree so that the whole tree shook from it. It was the opinion of the one who was up there

 

A  that it should split down the middle. All the boar had [in mind] was to eat. And the shepherd then

L  that it would split through the middle.

 

A  And the shepherd then looked [down] at the ground and saw that all the boar had [in mind] was to eat.

L  He looked toward [the] ground and saw that the boar had [nothing to do] but to eat.

 

A  So he put his hand into his apron and let the sorb-apples go, and the boar began to eat.

L  He puts [his] hand on his apron and detaches it and lets the sorb-apples fall. And the boar begins to eat,

    and when it has eaten, he lets the other apron go again, and the boar begins to eat [again].

 

A  While the boar was eating, it fell asleep. When the shepherd saw this, he climbed down lower

L  And while it attended much to eating, the shepherd

 

A  towards the ground and held himself with one of [his] hands by the branches and with the other began

L  held himself by one of [his] hands to the branch and put the other one on the boar’s back and begins

 

A  to scratch the boar. The boar felt drunken, so it bent [its] two hind-legs and then [its] fore-legs, and [the

L  to scratch. The boar feels drunken, so it rises onto its two hind-legs and then onto [its] fore-legs; and

 

A  shepherd] began to scratch and held firmly on to the branch and then put his [free] hand under [the boar’s]

L  he begins to scratch and held himself firmly to the branch and then puts his hand on the other

 

A  stomach and began to scratch until the boar lay down, and [fol. 11b] he [continued] to scratch. The boar

L  and begins to scratch. And the boar lies down and he [goes on] scratching. And the boar

 

A  closed [its] eyes and fell asleep. The shepherd covered its head with his overalls and scratched vigourously

L  closes [its] eyes, and he descends down from the tree and does not cease at all to scratch. He saw that the

     boar had [its] eyes closed, so he covers [its] eyes and [its] head with his coat and scratches hard

 

A  with [his] left hand, then pulls his knife out of its sheath. The shepherd was strong

L  with the left hand and pulls the knife out of the sheath with the right hand. The shepherd was [p. 24] strong

 

A  and resolute and was not at all scared. So he raised the knife and struck the boar right through the body

L  and virtuous and was not frightened at all and strikes it right through [its] body, straight

 

A  at the heart’s place. He recommenced and struck [the boar] all the way through the heart and killed it.

L  to the heart. And he begins again and strikes another time, right through the carcass all the way to the heart

     and kills it.

 

A  The shepherd left, who this time did not want to do more, neither cut up nor carry off [the boar].”

L  The shepherd went off who this time did not want to do more, neither cut [it] up, nor carry its pieces away.”

 

 

 

Medicus

The second sage’s, Augustes’s/Auxilles’s story

 

A  [fol. 12a] “Hippocrates was the wisest man that one could find. From all his lineage

L  [p. 26] “Sire, Hippocrates was the wisest physician that one might find in all lands. From his entire lineage

 

A  he had only one nephew. He did not want to teach him anything of his knowledge, and

L  he had only one nephew. To this nephew he did not want to teach anything of his knowledge, nor tell [him]  

     anything.

 

A  nevertheless the young man thought that it was proper for him to know certain things. So he listened

L  Nevertheless the young man thought to himself that it behooved him to know some thing[s]. So he listened

     and put his attention to power[ful execution].

 

A  carefully to [his uncle] and paid him great attention and worked at it so much that he knew [a lot] and

L  And he did so much that he opened himself up to his uncle.

 

 

A  revealed to his uncle Hippocrates his [fol. 12b] knowledge. Hippocrates saw that he knew enough.

L  Hippocrates looked and saw that he knew enough.

 

A  Hardly any time passed before news came that the king of Hungary had a son who was sick,

L  There passed hardly [any time] before news came to him that the king of Hungary had a sick son

 

A  so he asked Hippocrates to come to him. And he replied that he could not go there, but that he would

L  and asked Hippocrates that he come to him. And he answered that he could not go there, but he would

 

A  send him a nephew of his. He ordered his nephew to ready himself and loaded a pack-horse for him

L  send him a nephew of his. And he ordered his nephew that he prepare himself and equip himself; and he

     loads up a pack-horse for his nephew

 

A  and told him to leave with the messengers. They travelled until they came to the king in Hungary.

L  And he wandered until he came to Hungary, to the king.

 

A  One brought the child before him. He looked at it and then at the king and then at the mother.

L  One led the child before him. He looks at it and looks at the father and looks at the mother.

 

A  He took her by the hand, then drew her aside and then asked to see the urine of all three.

L  He takes the mother and leads her to an[other] area and asks them the urine of the three [of them].

 

A  They showed him. When he had seen it, he thought [and] then called the queen and said to her:

L  One showed him all [samples], and when he had seen them, he thought very profoundly in his heart and 

     analyzed them another time and called the queen:

 

A  ‘Madam, whose child is this?’ ‘Sir, he is [fol. 12c] my son and the son of my lord the king.’

L  :‘[My] lady,’ he said, ‘whose son is this child? By which man was it engendered?’ ‘Sire, he is my son and my 

     lord’s son.’

 

A  ‘Madam, I well believe that he is your son, but he is not the king’s son.’

L  ‘[My] lady, I well believe that he is your son, but he is not at all the son of your hus- [p. 27] band.’

 

A  ’He is so,’ says the queen. ‘That’s not true,’ he says, ‘and if you don’t tell me otherwise, I will leave.’

L  ‘Sire, he is so,’ said the queen. ‘ He is not, [my] lady, and if you do not tell me another thing, I will go away.’

 

A  ’By [my] faith,’ she goes, ‘if I knew that you said it for sure, I would have your body put to shame.’
L 
‘Sire, if I knew that you would tell me it for certain, I would do you great shame.’

 

A  ’Madam, I shall leave; but know this well: if you don’t tell me who fathered him, he cannot [find] healing.’

L  ‘[My] lady,’ he said, ‘I will go away, for if I do not know the truth, I would not at all give him the healing

     [treatment].’

 

A  Then he leaves [her] and began to shake his head. When the queen sees this, she calls him back

L  He departs from there and begins to pack. When the queen sees this, she calls him back

 

A  and said to him: ‘Sir, I will tell it to you on condition that no word of it get out.’ ’Madam, he said, none will.’
L  and said to him: ‘Sire, I will tell you it, and by God, make sure that there is no word of it.’ ‘[My] lady, it will

     not be.’

 

A  ‘Sir,’ goes the lady, ‘it happened that the count of Namur was passing through this country, and [fol. 12d]

L  ‘Sire, it happened that the count of Namur came through this country and

 

A  my lord put him up, and in the end he appealed to me and he lay with me and fathered this child.

L  lodged with my lord and so much [so] that he pleased me and that he lay with me and engendered this boy.


A
  Sir, for God[’s sake], speak to nobody about it.’ ‘Madam, I will not. He must have adultery poisoning.

L  Sire, for God[‘s sake], never speak of it.’ ‘I will not do [it], [my] lady; he is [born of] adultery, I will make

     poison against adultery:

 

A  Give him beef (meat) to eat.’ They carried out his order, and as soon as he had eaten some, he was healed.

L  give him beef meat to eat.’ They did [according to] his order: as soon as he had eaten of it, he [was] healed.

 

A  When the king saw that his son was healed, he gave [Hippocrates’s nephew] all he wanted. He now left

L  When the king saw that his son was healed, he gave to that one from his wealth. And he

 

A  all happy and came to his uncle. The uncle asked him: ‘Did you heal the child?’ ‘Yes, sir.’ ‘What did you give

L  came back to his uncle. Hippocrates asked him: ‘Did you heal the child?’ ‘Yes, sire.’ ‘What did you give

 

A  it to eat?’ ’Beef (meat).’ ‘So it was adultery?’ ‘True, sir.’ ‘You are wise,’ said Hippocrates.

L  it?’ ‘Beef meat.’ ‘So was it [born of] adultery?’ ‘Sire, true.’ ‘You are wise,’ said Hippocrates. Soon

 

A  Hippocrates thought of treason and of felony regarding his nephew. One day he called him and said to him:

L  Hippocrates thought of felony and [an] evil plan toward his nephew, and of treason.  He called:

 

A  ‘Handsome nephew, come with me into this garden. And [fol. 13a] when they were in the garden,

L  ‘Handsome nephew,’ he said, ‘come after me into that garden.’ They entered therein through the gate, and

    when they were in the center:

 

A  Hippocrates said: ‘God, what a good herb I smell!’ [His nephew] leaps ahead and kneels

L  ‘[By] God,’ said Hippocrates, ‘how [much] do I smell a good herb!’ That one jumps ahead and kneels

 

A  down and picks it and brought it to him and said to him: ‘Sir, here, look at it!’ Hippocrates took it in his hand,

L  down and picks it and brings [it] to him and said to him: ‘Sire, see it here!’ And he takes it in his hand: ‘It is

     true,’ he says, ‘handsome nephew.’

 

A  then advanced a bit further and said: ‘I smell yet a better one.’ [The other] came forward to pick it

L  He went still further ahead: ‘Now smell among them,’ he goes, ‘a still better one.’ That one comes forward

 

A  and knelt down. Hippocrates ha[d] equipped himself well and [now] pulls out his knife and killed his nephew.

L  and kneels down to pick it. Hippocrates had well equipped himself and pulls out a knife and comes after the

     young man [p. 28] and strikes him and killed him in the middle of all this.

 

A  And he did still more: he took all his books and burned them. After that, Hippocrates was sick to death,

L  And he did still more: he took all the books that he had and burned them. And so he was in the malady of death

 

A  he had diarrhea, (that is) death’s messenger. So he had a 268-litre barrel fetched

L  and had diarrhea: these are the messengers of death. . He had fetched [for him] a 268-litre (1 “muid”) barrel

 

A  and had it filled with the clearest fountain water one could find, then had the bottom pierced in a hundred

L  and has it filled with the clearest fountain [water] that one can find and has the bottom pierced in one hundred

 

A  spots and had a hundred [fol. 13b] wooden pins put into [the holes], then put powder around each [pin].

L  spots and he made one hundred spits and put powder inside around every spit

 

A  Thereupon he asked several people [to come] and said to them: ‘[Dear] sirs, I am [close] to death from

L  and asks for several people and from among his friends: ‘Sires,’ he goes, ‘I am [close] to death, I have

 

A  diarrhea. Look, I have had this barrel filled from the clearest fountain one could find. So now, pull all

L  diarrhea. Look! I have filled this barrel  from the clearest fountain that one can find. Now pull [and free up] all

 

A  the pins out!’ ‘Willingly,’ they go. Now they pull them out, but not a [single] drop of water issued forth

L  the conduits!’ And each one pulls his [out], and so no drops of water ever issued forth

 

A  from [the barrel]. ‘So you can see,’ said Hippocrates, ‘how I water-proofed this barrel,

L  from there. ‘Now you can see,’ goes Hippocrates, ‘that I can plug this fountain

     so that nothing can issue forth from there. Why does [the wood] germinate in this barrel?

 

A  and I cannot plug myself. I know for certain that I am dying.’ Before long after that  he was dead.”

L  And I cannot plug myself. Now I can well know that I am dying.’ And he said the truth; there did not

    remain a long time at all [before] he was dead and [had] passed on.”

 

 

Gaza

The empress’s third story

 

A  [fol. 14a] “In this city there was an emperor whose name was Octavianus. who loved gold and

L  [p. 29] “Sire, there was in this city an emperor who had the name Othe- [p. 30] vianus who loved gold and

 

A  silver more than any other thing. He loved [them] so much that he filled the entire Crescent tower with them.

L  silver more than [any] other thing. He amassed so much of it that he had filled with it the entire Crescent tower.

 

A  And [there] were [also] seven sages in this city. Five [of them] had gone off on a conquest. And of the two

L  And there remained two sages in this city, the [other] five had gone away on conquest. Of the two

 

A  sages who stayed behind, one was so generous and so [free-]spending that he spent

L  sages who had remained one one was so generous and so [free-]spending that he put into giving [away]

 

A  what he [fol. 14b] had, and when he could not get [money], he borrowed it.

L  everything he had and even what he could not have, and he borrowed [therefore] in several places;

 

A  His [money] was refused to nobody. He had two sons and two daughters. He dressed nobly

L  [what was] his was refused to nobody. He had one son and two daughters and clothed himself very richly

 

A  and spent much on his body, his own and his children’s. The other sage was so penny-pinching and

L  and cared for his body and his children expensively. The other of the [two] sages was frugal and

 

A  avaricious that he did not want to spend anything, and however much he could have, he kept it.

L  so avaricious that he did not want to spend anything and so “frozen” [in avarice] that everything that he 

    had he kept and [held] firmly [in a] strangle[hol]d.

 

A  To this one Octavianus entrusted the protection of his tower and his treasure. The generous sage

L  To his one Otheniavus gave [the task] of watching over his tower and his treasure. On the other sage this

     weighed much, [he] who would well have wanted to have the watch over it because he was in need of  

      several things. So he thought to himself 

 

A  one night called one of his sons and said to him: ’Go, and take a pick-axe and I [shall take] another one,

L  one night and took two pick-axes and calls his son: ‘Come here, hold this pick-axe I [will take] that one,

 

A  and let’s go to the Crescent tower and pick [at it] until we pull the treasure out. and with that money we will

L  and we will go into the Crescent tower and let’s do so much that we enter inside and let’s take enough of the   

     wealth and so we will

 

A  be well-off and will pay our debts.’ ‘Oho, Sire,’ said the young man, ‘this we will not do at all.

L  be at ease and will acquit [ourselves of our debts].’ ’Truthfully, sire,’ said the young man, ‘this we will not

     do at all; there is no greater shame than this one.

 

A  What would we do if we [fol. 14c] were found there? We and our lineage would be dead and dishonoured.’

L  What will we do if we were to be found there?’

 

A  ‘It will never happen,’ goes the father, ‘that people find us there, and I want you to come [with me] there.’

L  ‘Son,’ he goes, ‘this will never happen that one would find us there. I want that you come there.’

 

A  ‘Handsome father, I will do your bidding.’ It was overcast, the sun did not shine nor does any star appear

L  ‘Sire, he said, ‘I will do your wish.’ It was thick[ly dark], the moon does not shine, star[s] did not appear.

 

A  in the sky. Now they went off there and began to pick around the foot of the tower and picked away

L  They go that way and come to the foot of the tower and picked and hammered

 

A  until they entered it. Then they loaded of those riches [on their shulders] and carried away

L  until they entered inside. And so they come to the wealth and loaded themselves and carried away in their aprons

 

A  as much as they could and left their pick-axe[s] in the tower and returned home and unloaded.

L  as much as they could carry. And they left [behind] their pick-axes. They came from there to their [p. 31]

    houses and unloaded themselves of the wealth that they were carrying.

 

A  The next day they paid their debts, and [the sage] dressed his household richly and had his houses,

L  The next day he shod and dressed his household and had his houses,

 

A  which were falling down, re-straightened and maintained himself nobly. [fol. 14d] and [then] he found the hole. L  which had fallen down, re-erected. The sage who watched over the tower went to look all around the tower and

     finds the hole and

 

A  So he entered inside and saw the pick-axe and saw perfectly that somebody had carried away

L  saw [that] it [was] reinforced inside and he entered inside and found the pick-axes and looked [and saw] that  

    one had carried [off]

 

A  part of the [emperor’s] possessions. So he came back to his house without in the least seeming [to be upset].

L  some of the emperor’s wealth, part [of it]. He issued back out without making any noise. And so he comes back 

     to his house

 

A  Then he had a dyer’s vat made and put it in front of the hole in the tower, and had a big,

L  and has a dyer’s vat sought. He has it carried in front of the hole in the tower and has a very big

 

A  marvelous hole made in the ground and had the vat buried in it. Then he took the strongest glue he could find,

L  and very marvelous ditch made and has the vat buried [in it]  and takes the strongest glue that could ever find

 

A  and sea clay and wood tar and [molten] lead and mixed them all together so that the vat was totally full,

L  and sea clay and wood tar and lead and has everything melted together so that the vat was all full.

 

A  then he took little branches and small sticks and put them over the vat and covered it with earth on

L  Then he takes little branches and put them over the vat, then covers [it]

 

A  [fol. 15a] top, [and] then he left. After that it took hardly a long time before the generous sage had spent what

L  over and goes away. There did not remain hardly [any time] before the generous sage had spent all that

 

A  he had carried home, so he had nothing else to spend, for he had held court splendidly and incurred great

L  he had carried [away] ] so that he did not have more to spend, for he had held a great court and made great

 

A  expenses. . One night he called his son and said to him: ‘Son, let’s once again go to the tower.’ ‘Oho, Sire,’

L  expenses. . One night he called his son back and said to him: ‘Son,’ he went, ‘let’s go again to the tower, to the

    king[’s treasure].’ ‘Ha, sire,’

 

A  said the young man, we won’t, control yourself.’ ‘Yes we will,’ said the father, ‘let’s go (there) another time.’

L  said the young man, ‘we will not do [it].’ ‘We will do so,’ says the father, ‘let’s go again, another time.’

 

A  Sire,’ said the son, ‘at your order, let’s go, by God.’ It was night and late. They started on their way,

L  ‘Sire,’ goes the young man to his father, ‘I will willingly go where you would command.’ ‘Let’s go, by God!’ It

     was night and  late and it was thick [with clouds]. They put themselves on the way,

 

A  the father in front and the son behind [him], until they came to the tower. And as the father thought he was

L  the father [p. 32] ahead and the son behind, until they come before the tower. The father marches ahead and

 

A  entering inside, he fell into the vat and got in up to his throat. He felt that the glue and the clay hold so tightly

L  falls into the vat and [the glue] came there to [his] throat, and he felt that the glue and the clay and the tar and

     the lead squeezed his limbs

 

A  [fol. 15b] his extremities that he could not pull one of them towards himself. He shouted altogether

L  his limbs such that he could pull nothing to him.  He shouted

 

A  beautifully to his son: ‘I am dead.’ ’ The young man said: ‘You are not, handsome father, I will help you.’

L  beautifully: ‘Ha! handsome son, I am dead.’ And the young man responds to him: ‘You are not, handsome

    father, I will help you.’

 

A  The young man lowered himself to the vat and the father said to him: ‘Pull back, handsome son!

L  The young man lowers himself to the vat. ‘Ha! handsome son,’ said the father, ‘this cannot be. Handsome son,

 

A  If you fall in you are dead.’ ‘So what shall I do?’ ’Cut my head off,’ he says.

L  if you fall in here, you are dead.’ ‘What shall I do then? I will go seek help.’ ‘I do not want [that], but I will tell

     you what you will do cut off my head!’:

 

A  ’Oho, handsome father, this I would not do in any manner, but I will go to get help.’ ‘It cannot be,’ says the

L  ‘Oh! Handsome father, this I will not do at all, but I will go to seek help.’ ‘This cannot be,

 

A  father, , ‘hurry up [and decapitate me] before other people get a hold of me, for, since I will have my

L  make haste before other people might come. Since my head will have

 

A  head cut off, I will not be recognized, nor will my lineage ever have any reproach in this.’

L  been removed from me, I will not be recognized, nor will my lineage ever have [to suffer] reproach for it.’

 

A  The other one lowered himself toward the vat with all the armour he had brought along and cut his head off,

L  That one lowers himself with the armour that he had brought and cuts off his head

 

A  then he was so panicked that he threw it into one of his father’s cesspools. [fol. 15c] And when the daughters

L  and carries it away. So furious was he and bewildered that he threw it down into his ditch. The daughters

 

A  found out about it, there was very great mourning throughout the house. In the morning, when the avaricious

L  [came to] know this and had great sorrow and were very sad. In the morning the

 

A  sage had gotten up, he came to the tower and entered it. He looked [around] and saw the one in the vat,

L  sage got up and goes to the tower and looks and saw that one in the vat and saw that

 

A  who had his head cut off. So he called his men and had [them] pull him out. He looked right and

L  he had his head cut off. So he calls his servants and had him pulled out of there. He looked right, he looked

 

A  left, up and down, but [the corpse] could not be recognized. So the sage ordered that one take two horses

L  left, above and below, but [the body] could not be recognized. He had two horses taken

 

A  and had [the corpse] tied by the feet to the[ir] tails and had it dragged through Rome, and he ordered

L  and had them tied to the knight’s feet and made them drag [him] throughout Rome and gave orders

 

A  that, wherever [his men] saw people doing great mourning, they turn [in there] and
L  [p. 33] to the sergeants that in the house where they would see [people] mourn, they were to turn [there] and

 

A  take them [into custody]. The men went on the horses all over Rome until they came up to the house of the

L  take them. . He had two young men on horses and they spurned them on throughout Rome, forward and   

     backward, until they came before the house of the

 

A  sage whom they were dragging [behind them]. And [the sage’s] sons were inside and his [fol. 15d] daughters

L  sage whom one was dragging. The young man was inside and the two daughters

 

A  [as well]. They came out. When they saw their father being dragged [around], they began to shout.

L  issued outside. When they saw their father being dragged, they commenced to wail and to weep.

 

A  [One] brother could not hold [his siblings] back, so he struck himself in the thigh with a knife.

L  The young man saw that he could not keep himself at all from crying and strikes himself with a knife

     through the thigh.

 

A  Those who were going [with] the corpse entered inside and asked for the master of the house.

L  Those who were going next to the dead [sage] that one was dragging around entered inside and asked for the

     master.

 

A  The young man answered that he was in town. ’And what then is the matter with these young ladies

L  The young man responded that he was in the city. ‘What then have these damsels

 

A  who are shouting so?’ ‘[My] lord, don’t you see that I wounded myself in the thigh with a knife?

L  who are crying?’ ‘[My] lord, so do you not see that I injured myself in the thigh with a knife?’

 

A  They were afraid that I had lost my mind or would die.’ ’It’s true, sir,’ they go, ‘we [can] see it for sure.’

L  ‘It is true,’ they went.

 

A  So they left the house and took the one they were dragging outside Rome and buried him.”

L  Then they depart from the house and follow the one that one was dragging around and led him outside

     Rome and bury him.”

 

 

Puteus

The third sage’s, Lentillus’s/Lantillus’s/Lantules’s story

 

A  [fol. 16d] “There was in this city a man who was from a great lineage and had no wife nor any heir who

L  [p. 35] “Sire, there was a rich nobleman in this city who was of high lineage and of a great [class of] people,

     and he had no wife at all nor a child who

 

A  would hold his land after him. . So his friends came and told him to take a wife by whom he

L  should hold his inheritance after him. His friends came to him and said to him that take a wife from whom he

 

A  may have heirs who would hold his land after him. He said that he would willingly

L  would have [somebody] who would hold his land after him; and he said to them that he would willingly

    

A  take one, that they search [one] for him. They sought him [one]. The man was old and senile, the

L  take her [if] they would seek her. They sought her. He was old and gone and [had] gone [on in years], and

 

A  lady was beautiful and young and had no delight from [fol. 17a] him nor any [love-]sport,

L  she was beautiful and young and blond. She came and he went on until he could hardly go to church. She had

     from him no delight

 

A  and [so it went] until she loved [someone] in the city. And it was at the time their habit and custom

L  and finally loved in the city another man. Now there was in Rome the habit and custom

 

A  that, if somebody was caught wandering all over Rome after curfew had been sounded, he was,

L  that, if any man or any woman was [p. 36] taken wandering around Rome after the curfew had been sounded,

 

A  regardless of how important his relatives were, detained until the next morning when the sages had come

L  whether [or not] s/he was of high standing or well connected, s/he would be detained until the morning when  

     The sages had come

 

A  into the assembly hall. Then he was chased and beaten throughout the city. And so the rich man’s wife

L  to the assembly hall. And then s/he was [chased and] beaten through the city. And so the nobleman’s wife

 

A  one night felt desire for her friend. It was very overcast that night. She was lying close to her husband

L  loved in the city and took pleasure with her friend. One night it was very thick[ly clouded] that night. She lay 

     with her lord.

 

A  and she remembered her agreement [with her friend] very well. The lady feigns and said to her husband

L  And then she remembered the covenant that she had made with her friend.

 

A  that she was sick.And finally she got up from his side and went down the stairs and unlocked the door

L  She rises from beside her lord and goes down the stairs and unlocks the door.

 

A  and found her friend. He began by kissing her and em- [fol. 17b] bracing her, and they did [according to]

L  She found her friend and commences to embrace him and to kiss [him in a] bad [way].

 

A  their wish[es]. But [common] sense and jealousy entered her husband’s heart and he got up and went

L  And jealousy entered into the lord’s heart. He rises as he could and went

 

A  downstairs as fast as he could and heard them talking together. He was furious and locked the door from his

L  down the stairs and hears them discussing together. He was furious, so he locks the door

 

A  side, then came upstairs to the windows and shouted and said: ‘Hey, madam, lady, nothing [you do now] is

L  and comes to the window, up[stairs], and shouts: ‘Ha! [my] lady, so now I have found you [in a] bad

    [situation]. May God never give you enjoy[ment] of the faith and the disloyalty that you carry toward me!’

    ‘Ha! sire, [by God’s] mercy, I say to you that I was sick.’ ‘Ha! [my] lady, [your excuse] is

 

A  worth [effort], for I have heard your lecher with you. ‘Hey, Sire,’ she goes,’ by God’s mercy, you certainly

L  worth nothing. for I have heard your lecher with you.’ ‘Ha! sire, you certainly

 

A  did not, pace your grace.’ ‘I certainly did,’ he goes.

L  have not. Have mercy on me!’ ‘Certainly,’ [my] lady, I saw him. [your excuse] is worth nothing.’

 

A  ’Hey, Sire, for God’s [sake], have pity on me. Curfew is about to sound.’ ‘I would

L  ‘Ha! sire, for God[‘s sake], have pity on me, soon now will sound the curfew.’ ‘Certainly,’ he said, ‘I would

 

A  like that for sure,’ he goes. ‘Hey, Sire, I will be dead and destroyed and will be beaten up

L  like it.’ ‘Ha! for God[‘s sake], sire, then I would be dead and destroyed, for I would be chased through Rome

 

A  tomorrow, and all my relatives will be dishonoured.’ ’Too bad, madam, for him who
L 
tomorrow and all my relatives would have shame and reproach from it.’ ‘Shame may have who[ever]

 

A  cares’ There in front [of the house] was a very ancient well. ’Sire,’ she [fol. 17c] goes, ‘if you

L  cares about it!’ There in front there was a well of antiquity. [p. 37] ‘By [my] faith, sire,’ said the lady, ‘if you

 

A  do not open the door for me, I will let myself fall into this well.’ ‘For sure, madam, I would

L  do not open for me, right away, the door, I will let myself fall into the well.’ ‘Certainly, [my] lady, I would

 

A  like that a lot.’ ’By [my] faith,’ she goes, ‘so you will never see me again.’ It was very overcast so that they

L  want it much.’ ‘Certainly, sire, you will never see me [again].’ It was very thick [with clouds] so that one

 

A  could not see each other. In front of the house was a big stone. She raised it up to her neck and came

L  does not see the other. There was a big stone in front of the house. She raises it to her neck and comes straight

 

A  to the well. ‘Sire,’ she says, ‘the heart cannot lie, to God be [you] commended!’ After [that] she let

L  to the well. ‘Sire,’ she goes, ‘the heart cannot lie. To God may you be commended!’ And she lets

 

A  the stone fall into the well. ‘Ah, [by] Saint Mary, now my wife is dead. I only did it in order to punish her

L  lets the stone fall into the well. ‘Ha! [by] Saint Mary,’ said the nobleman, ‘my wife is dead. I did not at all act [as I  

    did] if not to chastise her

 

A  and to test her.’ She came [around] to the back of the house, and he ran downstairs and opened the door

L  and to frighten her.’ She came close to the door, and he goes down the stairs and unlocks the door

 

A  and went to the well, and she went in and locked the door. Meanwhile

L  and comes down to the well. And while he was looking into the well to know whether he  might hear [her], and

 

A  he called out to his wife and said: ‘Beautiful sister, are [fol. 17d] you down there [in the well]?’

L  he called to her in high voice: ‘Beautiful sister, are you dead?’ And she enters into the house and locks the door

     and comes to the windows and said:

 

A  ‘Not at all,’ she says, ‘I am not dead at all. You would like me to be in the well. So now your lechery is apparent

L  ‘Not at all,’ she goes, ‘evil lecher, so you would like that I were in the well, but I am not there. Now is proven

     your lechery

 

A  and [so is] your badness. I was not beautiful enough for you.’ ’Ah, beautiful sister,
L  and your evilness. Was I not beautiful enough and gentle enough a wife?’ ‘Ha! [my] beautiful, sweet sister,

    open the door for me!

 

A  I heard such great grieving from you that I thought you had fallen into the well.’ ’May God help me,’

L  Such great joy I have from you that I believed that you were dead [?].’ ‘Ha! evil villain, so help me God,

 

A  she says, ‘you will not get [back] into the house.’ ’Ah, beautiful sister, by God’s mercy, the curfew is about to be

     sounded,

L  you will not enter here!’ ‘Ha! beautiful sister, soon now will sound the curfew

 

A  and if I am taken, I will be beaten up tomorrow.’ ’ ‘May God help me,’

L  and if I am found here, I will be taken and put in jail and tomorrow I will be beaten up.’ ‘This I want to see,’

 

A  she said, ‘I don’t ask for more. At last the good people will know what [kind of]

L  she goes, ‘I do not ask more. The sentinels will come and the good people and they will see what [kind of]

 

A  life you lead and have led for a long time.’ Then it happened that the curfew sounded and that the sentry

L  life you lead with me and have led for a great portion of time.’ Then see here that the curfew sounded now.

     Then see here that the sentry of the city

 

A  came and took him and said to the lady: ‘Hey, lady, never before did we hear [people]

L  come and take him while the curfew was sounding. They said to the lady: ‘ Never did we hear any man

 

A  talk about [fol. 18a] your husband’s vileness.’ ’So,’ she goes, ‘you can see now that I have hidden it

L  speak of the vileness of your [p. 38] lord.’ ‘Ha! [my] lords,’ she goes, ‘now you can know that I have hidden it

 

A  as much as I could. But now I do not want to hide it any longer, and you don’t know at all [the kind

L  all my life and as much as I could, and I do not want anymore to suffer it nor to hide [it], for you do not know

 

A  of] life he has led with me.’ ‘By [our] faith, lady,’ they go, ‘we will take him away

L  the life that he has made me drag on.’ ‘By [our] faith, lady,’ the sentry go, ‘and we will lead him away

 

A  now that the curfew will have been sounded.’ ‘Certainly,’ she says, ‘that makes me feel good.’ Then the curfew

L  as soon as the curfew has been sounded.’ ‘[My] lords,’ she said, ‘it is for me beautiful.’ And the curfew

 

A  stops sounding and they take him and lead him away into the tower as they were sworn to do,

L  stops sounding and they take him and lead him to jail like those who were furious about this thing,

 

A  and he was there until the next day when he was chased and beaten throughout the city.”

L  and he was [there] until the next day when he was chased throughout the city.”

 

 

 

Senescalcus

The empress’s fourth story

 

A  [fol. 18c] “There was a king in Puille who was a homosexual. He disdained women above all things.

L  [p. 39] “Sire, there was in Puile a king who was a homosexual. He disdained women above all things.

     He did not care about any [woman], as beautiful as she may have been.

 

A  And so it was until he became very ill and bloated, so that all his limbs became

L  And so much [so] that he bloated and that he entered into a great illness and bloated so that all his limbs became

 

A  indistinguish-able inside him until he [fol. 18d] requested a physician, and the latter came and looked at him

L  lame (?) inside him, and so much [so] that he demanded a physician. That one comes to him; he looked at

 

A  and saw his urine. . ‘Look here,’ goes the king, ‘if you can cure me, I will give you as much land and wealth as

L  and saw his urine. ‘Oho!,’ goes the king, ‘look if you will be able to cure me, I will give you land and wealth, as

 

A  will please you.’ ‘Sire,’ goes he, ‘great thanks, and I will cure you very well.’ The physician took care of him

L  much as will please you.’ ’ ‘Sire, great thanks, and I will cure you very well.’ Then he undertakes [to treat]

    him so intensely that he made him un-bloat and

 

A  until he was cured. He gave him barley bread to eat and fountain water to drink until his swelling receded

L  gave him barley bread and fountain water so much that he un-bloated altogether

 

A  and his limbs [re]appeared. One day he said that a woman would suit him: ‘By God,’ said the king,

L  and that [his] limbs [re]appeared. The doctor said that it behooved him [to take] a wife. ‘By God,’ goes the king,

 

A  ‘I will [indeed] have [my men] look for her.’ He called the [chief] officer [of his court] and said to him:

L  ‘I will have her sought.’ He called his seneschal:

 

A  ‘Seek me a woman.’ ‘Ha, sire,’ goes the officer, ‘I would be unable to find her, for they believe

L  ‘Seek me, ‘ he said, ‘a wife.’ ’ ‘Ha! sire, [by your] grace, I would not be able to find her because one believes

 

A  that you are still as bloated as you used to be.’ ‘Give her beforehand twenty [fol. 19a] marks from my treasury,’

L  that you may [still] be as bloated as [p. 40] you used to be.’ ‘Give her twenty marks from my income before

     you have her,’

 

A  goes the king. ‘Sire, willingly.’ The officer came to his wife and said to her: ‘Madam, you must earn twenty

L  goes the king. He came to his wife and said to her: ‘[My] lady, it behooves you to earn twenty

 

A  marks.’ ‘Sir,’ goes she, ‘how?’ ‘You will lie,’ he says, tonight only with the king.’ ‘Ha, sir,’ she goes,

L  ‘How, sire?’ ‘You will lie with the king, tonight only.’ ‘Ha! sire,

 

A  ‘thank you. For sure, if it pleases God, I won’t.’ ’You will so,’ he says, ‘I order you to.’

L  mercy! Certainly, if it pleases God, I will not do [it].’ ‘You will so do [it],’ he goes, ‘I command you [to do] it.’

 

A  ’Ha, sir, I will not do it, and if I have to eat dirt.’ ‘Madam, may loss come to him who does not want

L  ‘Ha! sire,’ she goes, ‘I will not do it, even if [I have] to eat earth.’ ‘[My] lady,’ he goes,

 

A  to win. [Your refusal] is worth nothing, you have to do it.’ ‘Sir,’ she goes,

L  ‘it is necessary to do it.’ ‘Ha! sire, more intense shame you [cannot] suffer, for God’s mercy.’

 

A  ‘by God, you will do with me as you wish.’ When night had come, the officer came

L  Lady, lady, he who does not want to earn, may loss come to him.’ ‘Your word is worth nothing,  

     sire, by God, you will do your pleasure with me.’ When it had come night[time], the seneschal came

 

A  to his master in the chamber where one put him to bed. The king said to him: ‘Officer, have you

L  to his lord in the chamber where he used to sleep. The king asks him: ‘Have you done

    what I said to you?’

 

A  sought the woman whom I mentioned?’ ‘Sire, yes, but she does not want to be [fol. 19b] seen,

L  ‘Sire, yes, but I do not at all want that one sees her,

 

A  because she is a noble woman. ‘By God, [so be it],’ said the king. The officer himself put out

L  for [the reason] that she is a noble woman.’ ‘By God,’ goes the king. The seneschal himself puts out

 

A  the candle and had all the sergeants leave the chamber. Then he came to his wife,

L  the candle and makes the people depart. He comes to his wife and leads her [in].

 

A  and she came before the emperor’s [sic] bed. The lady disrobed, then she threw herself next to the

L  She disrobes and throws herself besides the

 

A  king. The officer locked the chamber with them inside. The king lay with the lady until it was close

L  king. He locks the chamber on them. The king lay with the lady until it was close

 

A  to day[break]. The officer came to the chamber and unlocked it.

L  to day[light] and did his will with her. The seneschal came to the chamber and unlocks it

 

A  ‘Are you sleeping, sire?’ he said to the king. ‘Officer, I am not.’ ‘Sire,’ he said, ‘it is

L  and said to the king: ‘Sire, are you sleeping?’ ‘Seneschal, not at all,’ said the king. ‘Sire, it is

 

A  necessary that that woman leave, that she not be seen.’ ‘By my head,’ goes the king,

L  necessary that this lady goes out of there, that she not be perceived.’ ‘By my head,’ goes the king,

 

A  ‘she will not do that.’ ‘Sire, I had an agreement with her friends that she would

L  ‘she will not do [that] because she pleases me.’ ‘Sire, I had a covenant with her friends that it would

 

A  not be recognized.’ ‘By God,’ goes the king. The officer left the cham- [fol. 19c] ber

L  not be known when she would go away.’ ‘By God, goes the king, ‘she still pleases me.’ The

     seneschal departed from the chamber

 

A  and waited until it was day and prime was sounded. Then he came back

L  and waited until there was full day[light] and the prime of day was sounded. Then he came [back]

 

A  into the chamber and said: ‘Madam, madam, get up!’ ‘By my head,’ said

L  to the chamber [p. 41] and says: ‘[My] lady, get up, it is well [past] day[break].’ ‘By my head,’ says

 

A  the king, ‘she will not do that.’ The officer could not endure [it] any longer. He now opened the

L  the king, ‘she will still not do [it].’ The seneschal was furious; he opens one of the

 

A  windows and said: ‘Ha, sire, by God, she’s my wife.’ The king sat up and looked at the officer

L  windows for he could endure no more, and the ray of the sun shines on them. ‘Ha! sire,’ goes the

    seneschal, ‘mercy, this is my wife.’ The emperor [sic] gets up from his seat and looks at the seneschal

 

A  officer and then at the lady. After that he was very sorely enraged and said to the officer:

L  and looks at the lady. When he has in this way looked at them together, he was furious. So he calls

    [to] the seneschal:

 

A  ‘Scoundrel. traitor, why did you bring her to me?’  ‘For sure, sire, in order to earn the twenty

L  Evil underling, evil traitor, why did you bring her to me? Bad stinking bandit!’ ‘Ha! sire, by God,

     mercy, to earn the twenty

 

A  marks.’ ‘Because of greed you are disgraced,’ said the king. ‘By my head,

L  marks.’ ‘By my head,’ says the king, ‘through greed your are shamed. Out! out! Of my land

    immediately, by that lord who has the name God.

 

A  if you are found in here when I have risen, I will have your eyes torn out and your body dragged

L  If you are found there when I will be up, I will have your eyes torn out and [have you] dragged by

 

A  at [the end of] a horse’s tail.’ The officer [fol. 19d] fled, and all having been said and done,

L  by the tail of [a] horse through my whole land.’ The seneschal fled out of the land and

 

A  the king married [the officer’s] wife in his land.”

L  the king married the lady well and nicely in his land.”

 

 

 

Tentamina

The fourth sage’s, Maucuidarz’s/Malcuidraz’s story

 

A  [fol. 20c] “Sire, there was in this city an old sage of great age who had rich and

L  [p. 43] “Sire, there was in this city a sage [who was] old of great age. He had very rich and very

 

A  good land. His friends came to him and said to him to take a wife, and hardly would you ever

L  goof land. His friends came before him and said to him that he take a wife. And hardly will you ever

 

A  see an old man take [more] willingly a young wife. He said to them to seek him one.

L  see such an old man who would not willingly take a young wife. He said to them that they seek her  

     and he would take her willingly.

 

A  They found him a young and beautiful and blonde [woman]. The sage had [already] had two

L  And they sought her, beautiful and young and of pleasing body and blonde. The sage had had two

 

A  [wives]. He was old and passed his age. [fol. 20d] The lady was with her husband one year

L  wives. He was old and was passed his age. The lady was around her lord for a year

 

A  and not once did he have sex with her, even if it is that she had inclination for it. [But] at the end

L  during which she did not do any folly, even that it may be that she had great desire for it. At the end

 

A  of the year she came to the convent [and sat] beside her mother and said to her: ‘Lady [mother],

L  of the year she came to the convent [church] and sat down beside her mother and talked about one

     thing and another and [then] said: ‘[My] lady,

 

A  I get no solace from my husband. But know that I want to have sex.’ ‘Phew,

L  I have no solace from my lord, except talking and being silent. Know that I want to love.’ ‘Phew,

 

A  [my] daughter,’ goes the mother, ‘this you won’t do.’ ‘Certainly, madam, I will do [so].’

L  daughter, this you will not do.’ ‘Certainly, [my] lady, I will do [so].’

 

A  ‘Do you want to do so according to my advice?’ ‘Yes, my lady.’ ‘I advise that you test your

L  ‘Do you want to carry out my advice?’ ‘Certainly, [my] lady, [p. 44] yes.’ ‘I want that you test your

 

A  husband beforehand.’ ‘Gladly, mother. And on what?’ ‘Pretty daughter, [test him] on his tree

L  lord beforehand.’ ‘Willingly.’ ‘And about what will you test him?’ ‘About a pear tree of his

 

A  which is in your garden, which he loves more than all the other trees. Have it cut down,

L  that he loves more than all the other trees of his garden and I will cut it [down]

 

A  then you will see what he will say to you.’ ‘If it pleases God, he will not kill me,’ the daughter says.

L  and I will see what he will make of it. If it pleases God, he will not kill me.’ The mother responds:

    ‘By God, this weighs on me.’ Then they depart from there.

 

[The first test]

 

A  So the lady returned to her home and asked where her husband was. They told her that he had gone

L  The lady comes to her house and asks where her lord was, and one said to her that he had gone

 

A  to amuse himself on [fol. 21a] his horse in the company of his hunting master and dog trainer.

L  to enjoy himself, hardly [earlier] it was, on his palfrey, behind his leader of dogs.

 

A  She then called a servant of hers and said to him: ‘Take an axe and come with me.’ ‘Madam, willingly.’

L  She calls a servant of hers: ‘Go and take this axe and come behind me.’ ‘Willingly, [my] lady.’

 

A  They entered the garden and she said to him: ‘Cut this tree down for me.’

L  He comes into the garden. She comes to the pear tree: ‘Cut down for me,’ she goes, ‘this pear tree!’

 

A  ‘Ha, madam,’ he said, ‘I would not dare; that’s my master’s special tree.’ ‘You will do so anyhow,

L  ‘Ha! [my] lady, ‘I will not do [it].’ ‘You will do so,

 

A  I order you to.’ ‘For sure, madam, I will not do so.’ The lady takes the axe from his hand

L  I command it to you.’ ’ ‘Certainly, [my] lady, I will not do [it], for this is my lord’s good pear tree.’

    Give me that axe!’ She takes it in her hand

 

A  and starts to hit [the tree] so much [from] right and left that she cut it down, and he cut it into logs

L  and commenced to strike to the right and to the left until she has cut it down.

 

A  after [which] she ordered him to [have the tree] carried [away]. While they were carrying it [away],

L  And that one split it and she commences to bring it to [the house]. And while she was bringing it,

 

A  her husband came. He looked at the logs of the tree and the leaves and the branches and was

L  her lord comes. He looked at her

 

A  altogether beyond himself and said: ‘Where did you take this branch?’ ‘For sure, sire,’ goes the lady,   

L  and said to her: ‘How, [my] lady? From where did you take this log?’ ‘Certainly, sire, right there

 

A  ‘when I just now came [back] from the [fol. 21b] convent, they told me that you had gone for birds

L  when I came from the church one said to me that you had gone play with the dogs, on your palfrey,

 

A  by the river; and I knew well that you were sensitive to cold and that there was no log in the house,

L  and I know well that you are [easily] cold and in here there was no log at all,

 

A  so I went into this garden and cut down this tree.’ ‘Madam,’ said the husband, ‘I think that this is my special tree   

L  so I went into that garden and cut down this pear tree.’ ‘[My] lady, I believe that this is my good pear tree.’

 

A  that you cut down.’ ‘For sure, sire, I don’t know whether it is.’ The husband went out to have a look

L  ‘Certainly, sire, I do not know.’ The lord descends

 

A  and found that it was the [special] one that had been cut down, so he returned to his house and said:   

L  and finds that it was cut down. ‘

 

A  ‘Ha, madam, you have served me badly, that’s my special tree that you cut down.’

L  Ha! [my] lady,’ he goes, ‘very badly have you served me,  this is my good [p. 45] pear tree that I had [loved]

     so dearly and that I loved so much, and you have cut it down.’

 

A  ’Ha, sire,’ goes the lady, ‘truly I was paying no attention to it and I did it because I knew [full] well that you would

L  ‘Ha! sire, I have not taken notice of it and I did it because I knew well that you would

 

A  come [home] all wet and rained on.’ ’Madam, for that reason I will leave things for now, inasmuch as you did it

L  come all wet and all rained on.’ ‘[My] lady, I will let it be for now because you did it

 

A  for me.’ So they let it be until [fol. 21c] the next day when the lady got up and went to the convent and found her

L  for me.’ Then they left it until the next day. The lady came back to the church and came to her

 

A  mother and greeted her. The mother asked her how it was with her, and she said: ‘Good. I tested my husband.’

L  mother. One saluted the other. The mother asked her how it was with her, and she said: ‘Very well. I tested my lord.’

 

A  ‘Did you cut the tree down?’ Yes, for sure.’ ‘And did he say anything?’ ‘Sure, he did not greatly

L  ‘Did you cut down the pear tree?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘And what did he say about it?’ ‘Certainly, he did not at all give the distinct

 

A  pretend to be angry. Really, madam, I want to have sex.’ ‘You will not do [anything of the sort], let [things] be.’

L  impression that he was angry. Certainly, [my] lady, I want to love.’ ‘You will not do [so], beautiful sweet daughter,

     leave this folly be.’

 

A  ‘For sure, mother, I could not contain myself.’ ‘So in that case I will tell you what you will do. Test him again.’

L  ‘Certainly, [my] lady, I will do so, I would not at all keep myself from it.’ ‘Beautiful daughter, as long as you do not

      want to keep yourself from it, I will tell you what you will do.’ ‘And what, [my] lady?’ ‘Test him again.’

 

A  ‘Madam, gladly.’ ’I will tell you on what. He has a little dog that he loves more than any living thing.

L  ‘Certainly, [my] lady, willingly.’ ‘And about what will you test him?’ ‘I will tell you it,’ goes the daughter, ‘my lord

     has a greyhound that he has [held] more dear than anything living.

 

A  He would not suffer that one of his men move it from beside the fire, nor that anyone except him feed it.’

L  He would not suffer that any of his servants remove it from beside the fire, nor that anybody feed it if not he [himself].

 

A  ‘I will kill it tonight.’ ‘I approve it,’ says the mother. Then the mother departs from her daughter. [fol. 21d]

L  I will kill it as soon as tonight.’ ‘By God,’ goes the mother. Then they depart from there.

 

[The second test]

 

A  The [young] lady returned to her house. In the evening the fire was lit and burned brightly. The beds were well

L  The lady came to her house. It was late, the fire was beautiful and burned brightly and the beds were well

 

A  appointed with pretty quilts and with pretty rugs. The lady was dressed in an entirely fresh squirrel cape. Now came

L  adorned with beautiful quilts, with beautiful rugs. And the lady was dressed in an all fresh cape of squirrel [skins].

 

A  the husband from hunting. The lady got up toward him and removed his cape, then she went to remove the spurs

L  The lord came from the fields, she got up toward him and takes off his cape and wanted to remove his spurs

 

A  and committed herself much to serving him. Then she prepares for him a bright red mantle and put it over her

L  and obeyed him much and brings a fur[-lined] red cloak and puts [it] around

 

A  husband’s shoulders and prepares a chair for him. The husband sat down, and [so did] in turn the lady on a stool.

L  his shoulders [p. 46] and prepares a chair, and the lord sits down on it; elsewhere the lady sits down on a saddle.

 

A  The dogs lay down all over the beds, and the husband’s little dog lay down on

L  And the dogs came from all parts and climbed up on his/her beds, and the greyhound comes and sits down on

 

A  the lady’s cape which was entirely fresh. When she saw that she was very angry. [fol. 22a] Then she saw

L  the lady’s cape. The lady looks at

 

A  one of the cattle handlers from plough[ing] who had a knife at his belt. The lady lept forward

L  one of the cattle men who had come from the plough, and he had a knife at his belt. The lady jumps [up]

 

A  and took it, then with it struck the little dog through the entrails and killed it, so that the cape and the room

L  and takes this knife and strikes that greyhound and kills it so that the cape

 

A  were all bloodied from it. The husband looked at this marvel and said: ‘How, madam,

L  was bloodied and the [whole] place [too]. The lord looks at this marvel: ‘What is this, [my] lady,’ he goes,

 

A  were you so daring that you dared kill my little dog in front of me?’ ‘How, sire? So you don’t see every day

L  ‘how were you so bold that you dared kill my greyhound?’ ‘How, [my] lord? So do you not see every day

 

A  how they turn our beds upside down? Never will two days go by without it being necessary to do a washing

L  how they turn out your beds? There will never pass three days that it does not behoove us to do a laundry

 

A  because of your dogs. By God’s death, I will strike them with my hands if they lie down on my beds

L  because of your dogs. By God’s death! I would kill them further, all [of them], with my hands were they to go on

 

A  this way. Now look at my cape that I had just put on, [how] it has been mistreated. [fol. 22b] Do you believe

L  thus in here. Now look at my cape that I had never worn, how it has been turned out. Do you believe

 

A  that I’m not sad because of it?’ The husband replies: ‘Certainly, madam, you have served me badly,

L  that I would not be angry about it?’ The old sage [sic] responded: ‘Certainly, [my] lady, you have acted badly

 

A  I hold it against you. But for now I will leave it be, this time, [and] I will speak of it no more.’ ‘By [my] faith,

L  and I resent you for it, but now I will leave it be this time [and] I will no more speak of it.’ ‘By [my] faith,

 

A  sire,’ goes the lady, ‘you will do with me at your pleasure, for I am entirely yours. And know that I repent

L  sire,’ said the lady, ‘you will do with me [at] your pleasure, for I am all yours. Certainly, sire, much I repent

 

A  much for what I have done. ’ Then she started to cry very hard and says: ‘For sure, it weighs much on me,

L  that I did it, because I know well that you loved it much, and it weighs on me that I made you so very angry.’

 

A  for I know [full] well that you loved it much.’ When the husband saw her crying, he let [things] be.

L  Then she commences to cry. So she left [it] be

 

A  The next day it happened that the lady came to her mother [in] the convent. The mother, when she saw her,

L  until it came to the next day when she came to the church, to her mother. The mother saw her coming,

 

A  greeted her and [the daughter greeted her mother], then [the mother] reasoned with her and said to her:

L  so she salutes her and she her. The mother asks her:

 

A  ‘Pretty daughter, how have things been for you?’ ‘Madam, good, [fol. 22c] but I tell you that I want to have sex.’

L  Tell me, beautiful daughter, how it is with you.’ ‘[My] lady, well. Yet I tell you verily that I [p. 47] want to love.’

 

A  ‘Ha, pretty daughter, so you will not be able to retain yourself?’ ‘For sure, pretty mother, no.’

L  ‘Ha! beautiful daughter, so you could not hold yourself [back] from it?’ ‘Certainly, [my] lady, no.’

 

A  ‘Pretty sweet daughter, I have all my life stood by your father, so that I never committed foolishness

L  ‘Beautiful sweet daughter, I have held myself [close] to your father every day of my life, so that I never did a folly,

 

A  nor had any inclination for it.’ ‘Madam, it is not so with me as it was with you, for my father was a young man,

L  nor did I have desire for it.’ ‘Ha! [my] lady, it is not at all thus with me as it was with you, for my father was young

 

A  and you [were] a young girl when he took you, so you enjoyed one another. But I have no joy nor any distraction

L  when you took him, so you had your joys together, but I have from mine neither relief nor enjoyment.

 

A  from mine [husband], so I must chase after [them].’ ‘And with whom will you have an affair, pretty daughter?’

L  So it behooves me to pursue [further].’ ‘And whom would you love?’

 

A  ‘I will tell you who has asked me: the priest of this town. I won’t love a knight, for he would gab about me and

L  ‘Certainly, I will tell you it: the priest of this city who has requested and begged me,’ ‘The priest of this city?’ said the mother.

     ‘Certainly, it is true, I would not want to love knights, for they would boast to the people and would gab about me and

 

A  boast about it and ask me to commit to my promises, and I would be ashamed of it.’ ‘On we go, pretty daughter,

     [fol. 22d] do once again [according to] my advice,

L  and would ask me to keep my promises.’ ‘Oho! So do again [according to] my advice,’

 

A  for you will never see worse vengeance than [that] of an old man.’  ‘Madam, gladly will I carry out your advice.

L  said the mother. ‘And how, [my] lady?’ Test him again!’ ‘So much testing!’ goes the daughter. ‘Verily, I recommend it

    to you, by my head, for you will never see such bad vengeance, nor such cruel[ty] as [those] of an old man.’ ‘[My] lady,

    willingly will I do [according to] your advice.

 

A  ‘Pretty daughter, test him again, and I will tell you on what. Tomorrow will be Thursday and Christmas Eve,

L  ‘So of what will you test him?’ goes the lady. ‘Cerainly, [my] lady, it will be Thursday, Christmas Day,

 

A  so your husband will hold his Christmas [festivities] and will hold great court, for all the valiant men of this town  

     will be there,

L  and my lord will hold great court, so that all the vavassors of this city will be [there].

 

A  and you will be at the head of the table. And when the first dish will be sitting [on the table],

L  And I will have sat down at the head of the table in a chair. When the first dish will have been set down,

 

A  you will hurl your keys into the fringes of the tablecloth, then you will get up and will pull everything

L  I will entangle my keys in the fringes of the tablecloth and I will get up and so will drag everything

 

A  behind you. This way you will have testes your husband three times.’ ‘Madam, you speak well, and I will do so.’

L  with me. And thus will I have tested my lord three times.’ ‘So go,’ goes the mother, ‘may God give you [courage]

     to do well.’

 

[The third test]

 

A  She then left and came to her house, and [stayed there] until Christmas Day came. [fol. 23a] The vassals

L  That one departs then from there and comes to her house. She served her lord very well and very beautifully,

     until Christmas Day came. The vavassors

 

A  of the town had come and plenty of others. The tables were set and the tablecloths and the salt shakers and

L  of Rome Rome and many ladies had come. The tables were set and [so were] the tablecloths and the salt shakers

 

A  and the knives, and they sat down. The lady sat down at the head of the table. The servants brought the first

L  and the knives, and they sat down. The lord went to sit down and the [p. 48] lady sat down again at the head of

     the table in a chair. The servants bring the first

 

A  dishes and the spices with them on the table. While the servers began to slice [the meat], the lady entangles her keys

L  dish on the table and [also] the savour[ly spices]. And while the servers began to slice, the lady twisted her keys

 

A  in the fringes of the tablecloth, then gets up and makes a big step forward, and the dishes spilled [all] over the

L  into the fringes of the tablecloth. She gets up and makes a great step backwards, and the dishes come [down] and

    spread out [all over].

 

A  tablecloth. The husband was very angry, and the lady pulls her keys, which were entangled in the tablecloth,

L  The lord was angry, the lady removes her keys which were twisted into the cloth.

 

A  toward her. ‘Madam,’ said the husband, ‘you have acted badly.’ ‘By [my] faith, says the lady, I can’t [take it] anymore.

L  ‘[My] lady,’ goes the lord, ‘you have acted badly.’ ‘By my faith, sire, I could not [endure] more.

 

A  I was [simply] going to fetch your good knife which was not [fol. 23b] on the table, and that weighed on me.

L  I was going to fetch your knife and your apron which were not at all on the table, and it weighs on me.’

 

A  ‘Well, madam, by God, bring us another tablecloth!’ Then another one was brought and they ate happily.

L  ‘So, [my] lady, by God, bring us now other cloths!’ The lady has others brought, and one brings other dishes.

     They ate into night, joyfully.

 

A  The husband did not show that he was angry. When they had eaten and the tablecloths were removed,

L  The lord did not at all give a hint of his anger. And when they had eaten enough

 

A  the husband honoured them much and they left. Thr husband suffered this night [to go by]

L  and the lord had much honoured them, they departed. The lord remained silent [= suffered] that night

 

A  until the next day when the husband came to the lady and said to her: ‘Madam, madam,

L  until it came to the next day. [Then] the lord came to the lady: ‘[My] lady,

 

A  you have set me three bad traps. If I can, you will not set me the fourth. Bad blood makes you do this,

L  you have done me three bad tricks, if I can you will not do me the fourth. Bad blood makes you do this:

 

A  you must be bled!’ Now he gave orders to the head servant and had the fire made. When the lady saw

L  it behooves you to be bled.’ He summons the blood-letter and has the fire made.

 

A  such a great fire being made, she asked her husband [fol. 23c] what he wanted to do.

L  While the fire was [getting] big he comes to the lady. ‘What is this, sire,’ she goes, ‘what do you want to do?’

 

A  ‘Madam,’ he goes, ‘I want to have you bloodlet.’ ‘Ha, sire, goes she, I have never been bled in my life.’

L  ‘Remove your bad blood!’

 

A  ‘It is necessary,’ goes the husband, ‘to do it, for bad blood has made you set the bad traps you have set me.’

L 

 

A  Right then, whether she wanted or not, he had her bare the right arm and had it heated by the fire.

L  So he has her right arm heated at the fire. When it was well hot,

 

A  . The bloodletter struck her, and the blood gushed forth with great force. A [mixture of] mucus and

L  the blood-letter strikes there and the fluid flies big out of the arm, and a flame came out from it, like bitumen,

 

A  mud came out, so much so that [in the end] the red blood came out. Then he had the arm bandaged up

L  until the vermillion blood came. He has her ban- [p. 49] daged

 

A  and [had] the other arm stretched forth out of the dress. The lady began to scream, but it did not help her

L  and has her other arm undressed from the dress. The lady commences to cry, it is worth

 

A  in the least. He had the arm heated, and the bloodletter struck into it. The same [matter] came out of this arm

L  nothing for her. He has her heated again and the blood-letter strikes there. Another [matter] like

 

A  as [fol. 23d] [had come out] of the other, so much so that the red blood came out of it.

L  from the other [arm] came from this arm until the vermillion blood came from it.

 

A  When the sage [sic] saw the red blood, he had her bandaged up, then had her carried into a bed in her

L  When the vermillion blood came, the sage had her bandaged and has her carried into her bed in her

 

A  room. She began to scream and to wail. The lady asked for her mother and she came. When she saw

L  chamber. She commences to cry and summons her mother, and she came there. And when she saw

 

A  her mother, she said to her: ‘My lady, I’m dead.’ ‘How [is that], pretty daughter?’ ‘Madam, he had me bled.’

L  her, she said: ‘Ha! Ah! [my] lady, I am dead.’ ‘How, daughter?’ ‘[My] lady, he has had me bled in both arms.’

 

A  ‘Now then, pretty daughter, do you feel like having sex?’ ‘For sure, madam, not I.’ ‘Daughter [mine],

L  ‘So now, beautiful daughter, do you still have the inclination to love?’ ‘Certainly, not I. Rather I would be dead!’  

     ‘Daughter,

 

A  I told you so exactly: you will never see such cruel vengeance as from an old man.’ ‘For sure, madam,

L  I well said it to you: you will never see such a cruel man as an old one.’ ‘Certainly, [my] lady,

 

A  I will never again have sex.’ ‘By [my] faith, daughter, you will act wisely.’”

L  I will never love [again].’ ‘By [my] faith, beautiful daughter, you will do like a sage [person].’”  

 

 

Virgilius

The empress’s fifth story

 

A  [fol. 24b] “Sire, there was in this city a learned man whose name was Virgil, and he was a very good man

L  [p. 50] “Sire, there was in this city a scholar [“clerc”] who had [for] name Virgil, and he was a good scholar

 

A  learned in all [of] the seven arts. He knew a lot of magic, and through magic did he make in this city a fire

L  of all the seven arts. He knew much about magic, and through magic he made in this city a fire

 

A  that burned every day. And those poor women, who had those little children, when they [fol. 24c] could

L  which burned all days so that the poor women, who had their little children [and who] could

 

A  not enter where those rich men [live] in those high houses, who sleep until nine o’clock,

L  not enter those rich men’s [houses] nor those high towers nor those high halls [of theirs], [could] sleep until

    Nine o’clock

 

A  they warmed themselves by this fire and took hot water to bathe their children. Next to this fire there was

L  next to the fire and take fire from there.  Above there was                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

A  a man cast in copper, who held a bow and was aiming to shoot. On the forehead of this man

L  a man cast in copper who held a copper bow and an arrow, and he had well aimed. At the neck of this man

 

A  there were letters written which said: Whoever will strike me, I will shoot. In this city there was [also]

L  there were letters which said: “Who[ever] will strike me, I will strike [back]”. In this city there was a[nother]

 

A  a learned man from Lombardy, a noble and rich man, and he was at school. This learned man man came

L  scholar, from Lombardy, at school. And he was a noble and rich man. He came

 

A  to see the fire and looked at it and saw the letters that [the copper statue] had written on its forehead and

L  toward this fire and looks toward the cast man and saw the letters and

 

A  understood them and knew that there was written: Whoever will strike me, I will shoot. So he said to his

L  recognized them [and] that there was written: “Who[ever] will strike me, I will strike [back]”. [p. 51] He asks his

 

A  companions: ‘Shall I strike him?’ ‘Sire, yes, if it pleases you.’ He now [fol. 24d] struck him, and he shoots

L  companions: ‘Shall I strike there a beautiful hit?’ ‘Sire, yes, if it pleases you.’ And he strikes him and shoots

 

A  into the fire and extinguishes it immediately.” “Sire,” goes the empress, “did he not commit

L  and he strikes into the fire and the fire extinguishes [itself].” “Sire,” said the empress, “so did he not commit

 

A  a sin?” “Certainly, madam, yes.” “Indeed,” goes she, “for those poor women from all over the city took [their]

L  a sin?” “Certainly, my] lady.” “Yes, verily,” she goes, “for the poor women took the

 

A  fire there.” “It’s true.” “Sire, [Virgil] did still more. For at one of the gates of Rome he made a man cast in

L  fire there. It is tru[ly so], sire. He did still more,

 

A  copper [who] held a ball in his hand, and at one of the other gates he made a similar one, and one threw the

L 

 

A  ball to the other on Saturday night.” “That he did?” “Sire, he did still more.

L 

 

A  For he made through magic a mirror on a huge marble column by which those of this city saw those

L  for he made through magic, on pillors of marble, a mirror through which those of this city saw those

 

A  who wanted to come to Rome in order to do [it] harm, and as soon as they saw that some territory wanted

L  who wanted to come to Rome in order to do bad [things]. And as soon as they saw that no territory wanted

 

A  to rise up against Rome, they sent orders to the communities of the cities [fol. 25a] in the area, so that they

L  to rebel against Rome, they summoned the community [leaders] of the cities and

 

A  themselves [and] then went into that territory and distroyed it. [This went on] until the king of Puille

L  themselves and went onto that territory and destroyed it. Until the king of Puille

 

A  was furious about it and assembled all the wise men of his land and asked them what he should do about

L  was furious about it and assembled his men of his land and asked them for advice [on] what he should do about

 

A  Rome which was thus doing harm to his land, and what was their thinking and should he make truce

L  which so put his land to harm, and if they were subjected and rendered truce

 

A  with Rome. There were two young men there who were brothers. One of them got up and spoke to the king

L  to Rome. There were three young men there who were brothers. One of them raised himself up and spoke:

 

A  and said to him: ‘By [my] faith, sire, if you were willing to give us of your [riches], we would fell the mirror

L  ‘By [my] faith, sire, if you want to give us of your [belongings], we would fell the mirror.’

 

A  of Rome.’ ‘By [my] faith,’ said the king, ‘I will give you whatever you demand (for what [else] could I have it?),

L  By [my] faith,’ goes the king, ‘I will give you everything, as much as you will demand:

 

A  whether you want towns, whether you want castles, whether you want land.’ They replied: ‘We will put

L  if you want castles, if you want cities, if you want money.’ And they respond: ‘We will put

 

A  ourselves in your household.’ ‘Great thanks,’ goes the king. The first-born [of the two] said: ‘Sire,

L  ourselves under your administration.’ ‘Great thanks,’ says the king. The first-born spoke: ‘Sire,

 

A  now have two baskets filled with gold for us.’ ‘Gladly,’ says the king. Filled they were. He had them put

L  so have for us three baskets filled with gold.’ ‘Certainly, willingly.’ They were filled, and they have them put

 

A  on a sturdy cart with two horses, then they took to the(ir) road all  the way to Rome. At that time Crassus

L  in a strong three-horse cart. They took to their road right straight to Rome. At that time Crassus

 

A  was emperor of Rome, who was very covetous. They came so late to Rome that they took care [to watch] that.

L  was emperor who was very covetous of acquiring gold. They came so late that they took care that

 

A  nobody came out of the city. By one of the gates they buried one of the baskets and by the second [gate

L  nobody went out of Rome. At one of the gates they buried one of the gold baskets and at the second

 

A  they buried] the other one, and then they found lodging in the city and spent lots of money.

L  the other and at the third the other. And then they go lodge [themselves] in the city and made great expenses

     that night.

 

A  In the morning, when the emperor was up, they came to the palace and greeted him and said to him: ‘Sire,

L  [p.52] The next day, when the emperor had risen, they come to him and salute him and said to him: ‘Sire,

 

A  we are diviners and finders of treasures, so we have come to [fol. 25c] you, for we know [full] well that

L  we are diviners and finders of treasurers and have come to you because we know well that

 

A  in your realm there are lots of them.’ ‘May you be welcome,’ said the emperor, ‘and you will stay with me.’

L  on your land there is a lot of them.’ ‘Be you welcome,’ goes the emperor, ‘you will remain with me.’

 

A  ‘Sire, gladly, but we shall want one half of what we will find, and you [keep] the other.’ ‘By [my] faith,’ said

L  ‘Sire, willingly, but we want to have of it half of what we will find, and you the other [half].’

 

A  the emperor, ‘I agree. I can never have anything if not through you.’ ‘Sire,’ says the first-born,

L  The emperor responds: ‘I grant it, for I can have nothing here if not through you.’ ‘Sire,’ goes the first-born,

 

A  I will dream tonight and tomorrow I will tell you what I dreamt.’ ‘I grant it,’ says the emperor. They left

L  ‘I will dream tonight and tomorrow I will tell you what I will have found.’ ‘By [my] faith,’ goes the emperor,

    ‘I grant it.’ And they went away

 

A  for their lodgings and were much at ease that night. And when it came to the next day, they came to the emperor

L  to their lodgings and were much at ease that night, until it came to the next day. They came to the emperor:

 

A  and the first-born said to him: ‘Sire, I dreamt.’ ‘So tell [me] what [you dreamt],’ said the emperor.

L 

 

A  ‘Sire, I dreamt [of] a small treasure at the gate toward Puille.’ ‘Let’s go there,’ said the empe- [fol. 25d] ror.

L  ‘Sire, I dreamt [of] a little treasure at the gate toward Puille.’ ‘So let’s go there,’ goes the emperor.

 

A  ‘By [my] faith, sire, gladly.’ The emperor came there with a great company of people [who were] with him.

L   ‘By [my] faith, sire, willingly.’ He comes there, and with great company of  people with him that he had led

      there to see.

 

A  He brought miners, and they began to dig where the diviner said. When they had dug, they found one of the

L  And they commenced to dig where the diviner said. They had hardly dug when they found that treasure.

 

A  baskets that [the brothers] had put there. The emperor had it pulled out, and then it was divided so that

L  The emperor has it pulled out of there and it was divided so that

 

A  the emperor had one half of it, and the brothers the other. The emperor was overjoyed

L  the emperor had half of it and the two [sic] brothers the other. The emperor was much joyful about it

 

A  and coveted it much. The other [brother] said that he would dream [also]. He found

L  because he coveted it much. The second said that he would [also] dream thus. And so he did and found

 

A  his basket as well. The emperor congratulated himself for [having employed] them: ‘By [my] faith, gentlemen,’

L  his basket. The emperor lauded himself about them and said: ‘By [my] faith,’

 

A  he said, ‘now I truly know that you are for real.’ They replied: ‘Certainly, sire, that’s nothing. We have dreamt

L  he went, ‘now I know well that you are true.’ ‘By [our] faith, they go, ‘this is nothing. We have dreamt

 

A  [of] one of [those treasures] under that mirror [that is] so big that all the horses which are at your court

L  one so big that all the horses of your court

 

A  could hardly pull it [out].’ ‘Certainly,’ says the emperor, ‘this I would not want at any price:

L  could hardly pull it [out].’ ‘And where is it?’ goes the emperor. ‘By [our] faith,’ they go, ‘under this mirror.’

    ‘This,’ goes the emperor, ‘I will not do [p. 53] at any price,

 

A  that I cause the mirror to be felled, for we see in it all those who want to do harm to this city.’

L  [namely] that I have the mirror felled where we see all those who want to do harm in this land.’ And

 

A  Those replied to him: ‘Sire, do not worry that it may fall, for we will save it very well.’

L  they responded this: ‘Of this you have no concern, for we will scaffold it so well that it will not be able to fall.’

 

A  ‘By God,’ said the emperor, ‘so be there in the morning.’ ‘Sire, gladly.’ They took leave and went

L  ‘By God, so dig there in the morning,’ goes the emperor. ‘Sire, willingly.’ They take leave of him and go away

 

A  to their lodgings. When it came to the [next] morning, they came to the mirror and began to dig until the foot of

L  to their lodging. When it came to the next day they come away to the mirror and commence to dig and made a

     scaffold where they removed the earth from under the mirror. They dug all days until

 

A  the mirror was completely dug up, until it held only a little bit. When it came to the night, they left and 

L  the mirror was dug out (it held only by the scaffolding) and until night came. They departed

 

A  so did the workmen. When it was midnight, they brought fire and put it [fol. 26b] at the

L  from there, and the workmen as well. When it was midnight, they they brought the fire and put it on the

 

A  foundation, then they sealed it up [all] around. It burned inside. And when they saw that the fire had well taken, 

L  scaffolding, and it burned inside and they sealed [it] outside. And when they saw that the fire was well lit,

 

A  they went on their way. They had not gone [a] great [distance] when the mirror fell and

L  they put themselves on the [flight] road. They had not at all wandered greatly [off] when the mirror fell and

 

A  the marble columns broke into pieces. They saw it fall beautifully, so they went on being very joyful.

L  departed from there in great joy. And when it came

 

A  In the morning, when the high barons of Rome and from nearby there assembled to see the mirror,

L  to the next day, the high barons of the land assembled at the mirror.

 

A  they looked and saw that it had fallen [over] because of the emperor’s covetousness. The emperor came

L  They saw that through the emperor’s covetousness the mirror had fallen. The emperor came there.

 

A  and was very angry [because] of this misadventure. He had [his men] look for the diviners, but they

L  He was much moved by this great loss. He had the diviners sought, but they

 

A  could not be found. He felt deceived and was very much afraid. The high-ranking men of the land

L  could not be found. He felt swindled. The high men of the land

 

A  ask- [fol. 26c] ed him why he had done this. He did not know what to answer them, except that [he had done it]

L  asked him why he had done this. He did not know what to respond to them, if not [that he did it]

 

A  out of greed for gold. Now they took him and put a restraining device on his stomach because of the

L  through covetousness for gold. They take him and put [on] him [p. 54] a lock on the stomach, because of the

 

A  great scorn they had about the great loss they had suffered, then they took molten gold and

L  great anger that they had because of the loss that they [= the diviners] had made. And they take molten gold and

 

A  poured it down his mouth and into his eyes and into his ears, and then they said to him: ‘Gold you wanted,

L  pour it right into his mouth and into the eyes and into the ears, into the nose, and said to him: ‘Gold you wanted,

 

A  gold you coveted, gold you shall have and gold you will lose and by gold you will die.’”

L  gold you coveted, gold you shall have, and from gold you will die.’ And in this manner they killed him.”

 

 

 

 

Avis

The fifth sage’s, Caton’s story

 

A  [fol. 27c] “Sire,” said Caton, “in this city there was a burgher who had a magpie which spoke the Roman language

L  [p. 55] “Sire,” he goes, “ there was in this city a burgher who had a [p. 56] magpie which spoke when one asked

     it what it had seen, because it talked well [in] the Roman language.

 

A  very well.

L  And the wife of the burgher was not at all wise, because she loved in the city.

 

A  And when the burgher came from outside, the magpie told him whatever it knew and [had] heard and

L  And when the burgher came [from] outside, the magpie said to him what it had

 

A  and seen. And it often happened that the magpie told the man the truth. When the wife’s friend had been

L  seen, and often it happened that the magpie spoke the truth to him, the burgher, that [for example] the wife’s

 

A  with her, he believed [his magpie] entirely.

L  friend had been there. And he believed it very well, because it did not know how to lie, rather it said to its

     lord all days what she saw. [So it went].

 

A  Until the gentleman had gone away on business and did not return that [fol. 27d] night. The lady asked her friend

L  until the lord was out on his merchant-business. He did not come back that night. The lady summoned her friend.

 

A  [to come]. The magpie was high up in a cage [which was] attached to a pole. The friend came up to the house

L  The magpie was in a cage attached on high to a pole in the middle of the porch of the house. And that one came

     up to the door

 

A  and did not dare enter because of the magpie. He asked the lady [to come]. She came to him. He said to her:

L  and did not dare enter inside because of the magpie. So he summoned the lady, she came to him:

 

A  ‘[My] lady, I don’t dare enter because of the magpie, because [I can’t be sure] that it will not tell your husband.’

L  ‘[My] lady,’ he said, ‘I do not dare enter inside because of the magpie, [for fear] that it would tell it to your lord.’

 

A  ‘Come [in, it’s] safe,’ she goes, ‘for a way [out of this] I will well think of.’ ‘[My] lady,’ he goes, ‘willingly.’

L  ‘Come forward,’ she goes, ‘I will well think about that.’ ‘[My] lady,’ he said, ‘willingly.’

 

A  He passed through and entered the [bed]room. The magpie looked at him and recognized him, for he had

L  He passes forward and comes into the chamber. The magpie looks at him and recognized him well, for he had

 

A  done it nasty tricks many times. So it said: ‘Ha, sire who are reposing in [my lady’s] room, why do you not 

L  done it trickery at certain times, and it cried out: ‘Ha! sire, who are reposing in the chamber, why do you not

 

A  here when my master is here?’ Then it fell silent and the lady thought of a grand stratagem. When night had fallen,

L  here while my lord is here?’ Then it fell silent, and the lady thought of an evil stratagem. When night had come

 

A  she took her chambermaid and gave her a big pot full of water and a cand- [fol. 28a] le brightly burning and a

L  she takes her chambermaid and brings her a big pot full of water and a candle all burning and a

 

A  hammer [made] of wood. When it came toward midnight, she made her climb up on the house right above

L  hammer of wood. When it came to [be] midnight, she makes her climb on the house, there at

 

A  the spot where the magpie was, and she began to hit hard on the shingles. When she had hit enough, she took

L  the place where the magpie was. And she commences to strike with the hammer on the shingles, and when she

    had struck enough, she took

 

A  the candle and thrust it between two shingles, which gave the magpie light[ning] into the face. After [that] she

L  the candle, thrust it through [and] in-between the shingles, so that the brightness of it came to the magpie

    between [p. 57] the eyes. Afterward she

 

A  took the water and poured it on the magpie. That kind of life she made it lead until day[light]. When day had

L  the pot and poured the water on the magpie. And such a life she led until day-

 

A  broken, she descended with the hammer in one hand and the candle in the other, and the lady’s friend left.

L  [light], and when it had become day, she descends, the hammer in her hand and the candle in the other. The

     lady’s friend went away.

 

A  Hardly [any time] remained after that before the master [of the house] came [back]. He came right straight to

L  It lasted hardly [much before] the lord came. He came right straight to

 

A  his magpie, greeted it and asked it: ‘Friend, how is it with you? Did you eat today?’ ‘Sire,’ says the magpie,

L  his magpie: ‘Friend,’ he said, ‘how is it with you? Did you eat today?’ ‘Sire,

 

A  ‘my lady’s friend was last night all [fol. 28b] long in here and lay with her. He left only a little while ago.

L  my lady’s friend has been in here at night, all night, and lay with her. It is hardly [any time ago] that he departed.

 

A  I saw him go through here.’ The master looked at the lady with a felon’s eyes. Then he turned toward his

L  I just saw him go right by here.’ The lord looked at the lady with felonous eyes. Then he returned toward his

 

A  magpie and said to it: ‘Certainly, [my] beautiful, very sweet friend, I fully believe you in this matter.’ ‘Sire,’

L  magpie and said to it: ‘Certainly, beautiful, sweet friend, I believe you very well about it.’ ‘Sire, it has been

     [that] night a bad night,

 

A  goes the magpie, ‘last night it thundered and rained all night and lightning came to me from all directions

L  and the lightning came to me

 

A  right into [my] eyes, and but for a little I [could have] died last night.’ The master looked at the lady and she

L  in my eyes. But for a little I have been dead.’ The lord looked at the lady and the lady

 

A  at him. ‘By [my] faith,’ goes the master, ‘last night there was a very beautiful and very clear night.’

L  at him. ‘By the faith that I owe God, [my] lady,’ said the lord, ‘it has been a very beautiful night, last night, and

     [a] very clear [one].’

 

A  ‘For sure, sire,’ goes the lady, ‘in my opinion one of the clear[est] of this year.’ The master asked his neighbours

L  ‘Certainly, sire, […],’ said the lady, ‘one of the most beautiful and clearest of the year,’ The lord asked his

 

A  neighbours and they told him the same thing. The lady saw [as] her [advantage] point that she could speak up,

L  neighbours and they said equally that it had been a very beautiful night. The lord was angry. The lady saw

     him in anger and saw well her moment that she could speak,

 

A  and she said to her husband, within earshot of his neighbours: ‘Now then, gentlemen, now [fol. 28c] you can

L  so she said: ‘Sires, now you can

 

A  hear for what my husband has always blamed and hit me, [he] who believed his magpie about anything it

L  see for what my lord has all days blamed and beaten and chased me, because he believed his magpie when it

 

A  told him. Now it has told him that my friend had last night lain with me all night. For sure it lied as [it lied]

L  spoke. Now here it said to him that my friend has at night lain with me. Certainly it lies just as well as it had done

 

A  about the weather.’ The husband was furious that his magpie had lied to him about the weather, similarly he

L  about the weather.’ The lord was angry about the fact that the magpie had lied to him about the [p. 58] night and

 

A  thought that it had lied about his wife. So he came to his magpie and said to it: ‘By my head, you will never lie

L  that thus it lied to him about his wife. He comes to his magpie: ‘By my head,’ he goes, ‘you will never lie

 

A  to me [again].’ Then he took it and broke its neck. When he had done this, he was so astonished that he did not

L  me [again].’ So he takes it and breaks its neck. When he had done this, he was so astonished that

    nobody [could have been] more [so].

 

A  know what to say. Then he dismounted the cage where the magpie was and saw the undone shingles.

L  He looked at the cage where the magpie was and looked upward at the shingles and saw them in disarray.

 

A  Then he took a ladder and climbed on top of the house and saw the pot that the chambermaid had left there,

L  He takes a ladder and climbs onto the house and saw the pot that the chambermaid had carried there

 

A  and saw the wax [that had] dripped on [fol. 28d] the shingles and that the roof was undone, and he saw the large

L  and saw the wax dripped on the shingles and looks [to see] that the [roof] cover was all uncovered and saw the big

 

A  through which she had thrust the burning candle. Then he realized the treason that his wife

L  through where she had thrust the candle all burning. So he thought to himself about the treason that his wife

 

A  had done him and began to mourn terribly and said: ‘Ha, poor miserable [creature that I am], why did I believe

L  had done to him and commenced to do his mourning: ‘Alas!’ he goes, ‘why have I killed it? Why did I believe

 

A  my wife?’ Then he chased his wife out of his house.”

L  my wife?’ He climbed down and chases his wife out of his house and commences to lose his mind and to wring

    his fists together.”

 

 

Sapientes

The empress’s sixth story

 

A  [fol. 29b] “Sire, there was in this city an emperor [sic] whose name was Herod, and he had seven sages

L  [p. 59] “Sire,” she goes, “there was an emperor in Rome who had for name Herod, and there were seven sages

 

A  such as there still are. But they had put forth in this city such a custom that whoever had

L  such as there still are. But they had put such a custom in this city and in this country that whoever dreamed

 

A  a dream, he came to the seven sages and brought them a gold coin and they told him his dream and explained

L  a dream, if he came to the sages and brought them a gold coin and told them his dream, [he would be] told [by]

 

A  to him what he had dreamed and what according to it could happen. And they had so much gold and possessions

L  them what could happen [because] of it. Thus they had so much silver and gold

 

A  that they [fol. 29c] surmounted the emperor in riches. The emperor had such an illness that, when he

L  that they surmounted the emperor in richness. And the emperor had such a sickness in[side] him that, when he

 

A  wanted to ride outside of Rome, he went blind and could not go outside [the city]. Until one day he called

L  wanted to issue [forth] outside the gates of Rome, he went blind. And he had tried [to do so] many times and

     could not issue [forth]. Until one day he called

 

A  the seven sages and said to them: ‘Sires, tell me what I will ask you.’ They replied: ‘Willingly.’

L  his seven sages: ‘[My] lords,’ he said, ‘tell me [the answer to] what I will ask.’ And they responded: ‘Willingly.’

 

A  ‘Why,’ he said, ‘do my eyes go blind when I must go outside this city?’ ‘Sire,’ the sages say, ‘to this we do not

L  ‘Why,’ he goes, ‘do my eyes go blind when I want to issue out of Rome.’ ‘Sire, to this we do not

 

A  know how to reply to you without a delay.’ ‘Must there be a delay?’ says the emperor. ‘By [our] faith, sire, yes.’

L  know [how to] respond without a delay.’ ‘How?’ he goes, ‘is a delay necessary?’ ‘Sire, yes.’

 

A  ‘And I give it to you: up to eight days.’ ‘Sire. that would be little, [give us] rather up to fifteen.’ ‘By God,

L  ‘And I give you up to four days.’ ‘Sire, but [we need] up to eight days.’ And he gives [it] to them.

 

A  [so be it],’ said the emperor. Thereupon they leave. They do not want to let [fol. 29d] a long time [go by since]

L  They depart. And they do not want [p. 60] to leave [things] in a long [wait] period.

 

A  the emperor’s request; rather they sought advice from several people until one told them that a child was in the

L  They pursued and enquired [about] advice from many people, until one said to them that a child was in the

 

A  land, who had had no father, [and] who gave explanations for whatever one asked of him. They went forth

L  land who had had no father and had for name Mellin. So they they put themselves on the road and

 

A  outside Rome and came to the area where [the child’s presence] had been indicated to them, and they eventually

L  and go to that place where it had been taught them, until they

 

A  found him in a town where he was mingled amidst his companions who reproached him that he

L  found him outside Rome where he had mixed himself up with his companions who reproached him that he

 

A  was born without a father. The sages stopped there and asked who he was and what his name was. Those

L  had been born without father. And the sages stopped and asked him how he was named. And the child had said:

 

A  replied that his name was Mellin. There came now to the sages a man who was disturbed by a dream he had

L  said:  ‘Mellin.’ See here now [how] a nobleman came to the sages who was disturbed by a dream that he had

 

A  dreamed, and he held a gold coin [fol. 30a] in his hand. Mellin came toward him and said to him: ‘I know

L  dreamed, and carried a gold coin in his hand. And Mellin came to his encounter and said: ‘I know

 

A  perfectly where you are going and what you are asking and what you are bringing.’ The sages listened to him.

L  well what you are searching and what you are asking and what you are bringing.’ And the sages listen.

 

A  ‘You dreamed,’ said Mellin, ‘a dream because of which you are disturbed, and therefore you are going to Rome

L  ‘You have dreamed a dream by which you are disturbed, so you are going to Rome

 

A  to the sages and are bringing them a coin.

L  to the sages, and you will say to them what you have dreamed and will give them a coin that you are carrying,

     and they will tell you your dream. But I will do better by you, because

 

A  I will tell you [the dream], and you will take your coin [back]. You dreamed that in the centre of your house

L  I will tell you your dream and you will carry away your coin. You dreamed that in the centre of your home

 

A  there is a fountain and that all those of your household were served and watered by it. The fountain 

L  there was a great fountain [so] that all those of your neighborhood were served and watered by it. The fountain

 

A  signifies a great treasure which is underneath your house. Go and have it dug up and from it you and your entire

L  signifies a great treasure which is under your home. So go and dig it up, so that you and your

 

A  family will be rich, if it is not taken away from you.’ The man returned to his house and the sages and

L  lineage, if it is not taken away from you, may be rich from it, you [yourself] and they.’ The nobleman comes

    into his house and the sages and

 

A  servants [as well]. The man asked for workers and had [them] dig until they found the treasure and pulled it

L  the valets with [him]. The nobleman summons workers and has [them] dig, and they dug until they found the 

     treasure.

 

A  [fol. 30b] up. There was a lot of it, a great plenty. The sages took as much as they wanted and

L  Much was there of it, in great plenty. And the sages took from it at their will, as much as they wanted, and they 

 

A  offered some to the child, but he had no desire for it. The sages left and took the child with them.

L  offer [some] of it to the young man, but he did not want to take any of it. The sages depart and lead the young

     man away with them.

 

A  When they were outside the town they asked him whether he would be able to tell the emperor why his eyesight

L  And when they were outside the city, they asked the young man if he would know how to render to Herod the

     reason why the eyesight

 

A  gave him trouble whenever he wanted to leave Rome. Mellin said: ‘Yes, [very] well.’ So they took him

L  trou- [p. 61] bled him when he wanted to issue out of Rome, and he said to them: ‘Yes.’ They led the young man

 

A  to Rome before the emperor on the day that had been set for the response. One of them spoke up and said:

L  before the emperor. Within the delay [according to which] the day had been set to respond, one of them spoke:

 

A  ‘Sire, we have come on our day to respond why your eyesight gives you trouble whenever you want to go outside

L  ‘Sire, we have come on our day to respond why [your] eyesight troubles you when you want to issue out of

 

A  Rome.’ ‘That’s true,’ says the emperor. ‘Sire, we have brought a child who will respond for us.’

L  Rome.’ ‘It’s true,’ said the emperor, ‘so tell [me].’ ‘Sire, we have led to you this child who will respond for us.’

    

A  ‘Do you take take [fol. 30c] upon you what he will say?’ ‘Sire, yes.’ ’So speak, I will hear it willingly.’ ‘Sire,’

L  ‘Do you take upon you whatever he will say?’ goes the emperor. ‘Sire, yes.’ ‘So then tell,’ says the emperor. ‘Sire,’

 

A  goes Mellin, ‘lead me to a room and there I will speak to you.’ ‘Willingly,’ says the emperor.

L  goes Mellin, ‘lead me into your chamber; there I will speak to you and will tell you why [your] eyesight troubles

     you when you want to issue out of Rome. There I will tell you it.’ ‘Willingly,’ goes the emperor.

 

A  So he led him into his room and Mellin began to say to him:

L  The emperor leads him into his chamber, by the hand, and the emperor says to him: ‘Now tell [me].’ ‘Sire,

     willingly,’ goes Mellin, then commences his story:

 

A  ‘Sire, listen to me. Under your bed there is a cauldron which bubbles in great waves, and there

L  ‘Sire,’ goes Mellin, ‘under your bed where you lie down there is a cauldron which boils at great waves and there

    

A  are seven bubbles in great waves, and there are seven bubbles and as long as the seven bubbles last and as long

L  are seven devils.

 

A  as that cauldron is there, you cannot go outside Rome,

L  And as long as this cauldron will be there and these seven devils are there, you cannot issue from Rome, because

    you cannot see a path nor recognize, nor sense a road.

 

A  [whatever] road or path you may know. And if you take out the cauldron without extinguishing the bubbles,

L  And if you remove the cauldron without extinguishing the bubbles,

 

A  you [will] have lost your eyesight forever.’ ‘By [my] faith, handsome, gentle friend, goes the emperor, you must

L  you have lost [your] eyesight.’ [p. 62] ‘By my] faith,’ goes the emperor, ‘handsome sweet brother, so it behooves  

    [you] that you

 

A  advise me in this matter.’ ‘Sire, willingly. Have the bed taken [fol. 30d] out and have [your men] dig.’ 

L  advise me.’ ‘Certainly, sire,’ goes Mellin, ‘I will willingly do so. Sire, have the bed removed and have [people]

     dig [there].’

 

A  The emperor had the bed taken out. Afterward he had [his men] dig until the cauldron was found.

L  The emperor summons people, up to twenty men, and has [them] dig under the bed and until they found the    

     cauldron.

 

A  The sages were there and several people who saw it. The emperor spoke to the child and said:

L  And the sages were there and several people who saw this marvel and looked at that cauldron which was

     boiling. The emperor called the young man and said:

 

A  ‘Young man,’ he goes, ‘now I know perfectly that you are wise. So from now on I want to act according to
L  ‘Now I see well that you are true, so I want from now on to proceed by

 

A  your advice.’

L  your advice and by your sense do whatever I will do, and I will do whatever you will advise me.’

 

A  ’Sire,’ he says, ‘great thanks. Have all these people draw back and go out from in here.’ Now they went away,

L  ‘Sire,’ goes Mellin, ‘so make these people flee from in here right away.’ And he did so now. They went all

     away because the emperor had commanded it.

 

A  then Mellin said to him: ‘Sire, do you see these seven bubbles? This signifies these seven devils that you have

L  ‘Sire,’ said Mellin, ‘you see well these bubbles which are bubbling, this signifies seven devils that you have

 

A  every day at your council.’ ‘Ha, [my] God,’ says the emperor, ‘will I be able to remove them from

L  every day with you.’ ‘Ha! [my] God,’ goes the emperor, ‘who are they? Will I be able to remove them [from]

 

A  around me?’ ’Certainly, yes, easily,’ says Mellin. ‘Can I see them and hear and touch [them]?’ ‘Sire,

L  on top of me?’ ‘Certainly,’ goes Mellin, ‘yes.’ ‘Can I see them,’ goes the emperor, ‘or seize [them]?’ ‘Certainly,

 

A  yes.’ ‘And who are they, handsome [fol. 31a] gentle friend?  Tell me it.’ ‘Sire, willingly. By [my] faith,

L  yes.’ ‘And who are they? handsome, sweet friend, name them to me.’ ‘Sire, willingly. By [my] faith,

 

A  they are those seven sages that you have around you. They are of your land richer than you are, and they are

L  these are the seven sages that you have together with you. They are of your land richer than you are.

 

A  used to a bad custom because of which the land is lost and they are rich because of it. For if a man, be he a

L  And they have put [into effect] a custom  by which the land is lost and ravaged, because they have put a

     custom in your land so that, if [any one of] your men, whoever he may be,

 

A  knight or a burgher, dreams a dream, it is absolutely necessary that he come to the sages and bring a coin

L  knight or burgher, dreams a dream, it is necessary by fine force that he come to the sages and bring a [p. 63]

     gold coin in his hand

 

A  and give it to them in order [for them] to explain his dream. And if they did it any other way, they would

L  and give [it] to them, and afterward they they tell him his dream and they explain it. And if they were to do it   

    otherwise, they would

 

A  believe that they are shamed. Thus the sages have given the people to understand. And because you have

L  believe to be shamed; thus the sages made them understand. And because you have thus

 

A  suffered this bad custom, your eyesight gives you trouble when you go outside this city. So, take the oldest

L  suffered it, you are lost through it and have troubled eyesight at issuing out of the city of Rome. But now take

     the oldest

 

A  of the sages and have his head cut off, and the [fol. 31b] largest of the bubbles will be extinguished.’ ‘By [my]

     faith, said the emperor,

L  and have his head cut off, and the biggest of the bubbles will quiet down.’ ‘By [my] faith,’ said the emperor,

 

A   I will do it.’ Now he had the oldest brought forth with the help of many people and had his head cut off, and

L  ‘and I will do it.’ He has him brought, the oldest one, by the force of his men and has his head cut off, and

 

A  immediately the biggest bubble was extinguished. The emperor went to have a look at the cauldron and found

L  the biggest of the bubbles extinguishes [itself] and calms and quiets down. And when he saw this, he had the

     others brought and taken. So has the emperor the seven sages taken

 

A  the big bubble extinguished. ‘By my head,’ he goes, ‘from now on forward, Mellin, I will believe you [and]
L 

 

A  Then he had the head[s] of all the sages cut off and the entire cauldron was extinguished and became totally cold.
L  and has their heads cut off, close to the shoulders, all [of them] together. And all seven bubbles quiet down, so

    that the water became all cold and all serene.

 

A  ’By [my] faith, sire,’ goes Mellin, ‘now you can remove the cauldron, and you [can] wash your hands in it

L   ‘By [my] faith, sire,’ said Mellin, ‘now you can remove the cauldron and wash your hands

 

A  and your whole body.’ ‘Willingly,’ says the emperor.

L  and all your body in [it].’

 

A  The emperor did as Mellin commanded him. When the cauldron was removed and the ditch [fol. 31c] filled in

L  The emperor Herod did as Mellin had told him, and the cauldron was removed and the ditch filled in.

A  and the bed was made again as it used to be, Mellin said: ‘Sire, now you can mount and ride [off].’ ‘By my head,’

L  And the emperor’s bed was redone as it used to be before. ‘Sire,’ goes Mellin, ‘now you can mount [your horse] and 

    ride out of Rome.’ ‘By my head,’

 

A  says the emperor, ‘that I will do. But you will ride with me.’ ‘Sire,’ said Mellin, ‘willingly.’ The saddles were

L  goes the emperor, ‘so I will do and you will ride with me.’ And Mellin said: ‘Sire, willingly.’ The saddles were

 

A  put on. The emperor and Mellin mounted, and the barons and the burghers of the land mounted

L  put on, the emperor mounts and Mellin mounts and [so do] barons of the land and everybody of the burghers

 

A  afterward in order to see the great marvel. It had well been five years that the emperor had not gone outside

L  behind in order [p. 64] to see this great marvel. It had well been ten years that the emperor had not issued out of

 

A  Rome. When [the moment] came to pass through the gate, Mellin was beside him and said to him: ‘Sire,

L  Rome, and he [now] wanted to pass [through] the gate, and Mellin was beside him. ‘Sire,’

 

A  you will go ahead.’ Then [the emperor] struck the horse with the spurs and passed [through] the gate and

L  he goes, ‘you will go ahead.’ The emperor spurs on his horse and passes [through] the gate.

 

A  his eyesight gave him no trouble. When the emperor saw this, he [felt] very great joy. Then he took

L  Never did anybody see such great joy as the emperor had. He takes

 

A  [fol. 31d] Mellin and began to kiss and hug [him] and kept him with him. And all the others made him a great

L  Mellin and embraces him and retains him with him. Those who loved the emperor had joy from it

 

A  feast when they saw that the emperor had regained his eyesight as he used to.”

L  when they saw that he had regained his eyesight as it used to be.”

 

 

L noverca

The sixth sage’s, Jessé’s story

particular to Version L,

see Link

 

 

L filia

The thirteenth, tthe empress’s seventh story

particular to Version L,

See Link

 

 

Version L ends with filia